Jamey Bergman
Cruise Critic Contributor
3.0 / 5.0
Cruise Critic Editor Rating: Cabins

By default, cabins are doled out by the cruise line. Passengers book within a particular class of cabin -- from single inside all the way up to grand suite -- and are allotted the "most favourable" cabins on a first-come, first-served basis. Passengers who wish to choose a specific cabin must pay an additional £45 reservation fee.

Cabins are furnished with soft goods in darker colours -- ours had a brown quilt with orange accents and a burnt orange carpet. The bedroom furniture is light-coloured wood apart from the floor-to-ceiling closet cabinetry, which is mirrored and houses the safe (the line charges a weekly rate of £15 for use of the safes). There are two nightstands, one which houses the refrigerator (standard inside and outside cabins are not equipped with a fridge) and the other which has one drawer. The well-lit vanity has two drawers and a large mirror, and there's a separate, small four-drawer bureau.

Bathrooms are en-suite with showers (Junior and Grand Suite cabins have bathtubs). The water pressure is good in the showers, but the plastic curtain doesn't quite keep the water from spraying onto the floors, and when running the shower at full tilt in our cabin, we found the drainage couldn't quite cope and experienced some flooding. Elemis bath products -- shampoo, conditioner, body wash and lotion -- are provided in deluxe cabins and above, and there is also a wall-mounted soap and shampoo dispenser inside the shower in all cabins. All cabins come with a hairdryer. The wall-mounted hair dryer in our bathroom was broken but there was a second hairdryer in the bureau drawer.

All cabins are air conditioned and have at least a basic colour television, with the more expensive cabins sporting wall-mounted flat screen TVs. TV channels are all in English and include Sky and BBC News channels, MSNBC, music channels and four ship-related channels (daily schedule, safety, shore excursions, and view from the bridge). There are no children's channels. Two movie channels show one recent hit movie per day, each.

For a mid-sized ship, Majesty is relatively well equipped for single travellers. There are 20 single cabins onboard, six outsides at the aft of both Deck 8 and Deck 9, and eight insides on Deck 6. All singles are 110 square feet.

Standard inside and inside plus cabins have either convertible single beds or, in the case of three- and four-berth cabins two single beds and one or two upper berths which fold away. Insides measure between 110 and 120 square feet and inside plus are 125 square feet.

All outside cabins measure in at 110 square feet, and some outsides on Decks 8 and 9 have restricted views. All 28 balcony cabins are located on Deck 8 and measure between 35 and 90 square feet, depending if you're in a deluxe balcony, junior suite or grand suite cabin.

In the 28 new balcony staterooms, the refurb is seamless -- you can't tell any work has been done to cobble the new balconies on. The only real drawback we found was that the balconies were directly over a popular sun-lounging area on the deck below. This positioning gave limited privacy and a bit of early morning chatter that could be disturbing for those who like to have a lie in and sleep with the balcony door open.

The Junior Suites are more than twice the size of standard cabins at 250 square feet and have the added benefits of a walk-in wardrobe, full-sized tubs, a living area with sofa tables and chairs, and a fully-stocked mini-bar. The four junior suites on Deck 9 can accommodate up to four passengers each, but the two at the prow of the ship on Deck 6 can only accommodate two passengers each.

The ship's two Grand Suites on Deck 9 offer everything that the Junior Suites do plus balconies, and measure 400 square feet.

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