By Colleen McDaniel
Cruise Critic Senior Executive Editor
4.0 / 5.0
Cruise Critic Editor Rating: Cabins

There are 49 all-outside-facing cabins onboard Sapphire, 82 percent of which feature floor-to-ceiling windows. There are seven categories of cabins spread across the three lower decks. Category 1 cabins are the most basic; these eight 150-square-foot cabins feature two small picture windows each. Category 3 cabins (there are two of them) have the same square footage as the Category 1 cabins, but feature floor-to-ceiling French balconies.

There are Junior Suites at 183 square feet, one with a picture window (Category 2) but the rest with French balconies (Categories 4 and 5); amenities are the same, you just get the extra space. Category 6 is the newest to the ship; these cabins were completely refurbished in 2017, with more space added, bringing them to 200 square feet. Beds in this category were repositioned so they face the windows. Finally, the top cabins are the 14 Suites, which are 300 square feet. The extra space is used for separate sitting areas, walk-in closets and large bathrooms.

We stayed in a Category 3 cabin with a French balcony; 150 square feet is about average, even on mainstream ships, but the floor-to-ceiling window treatment gives the sense of more space, and we never felt cramped. Whatever category you book, cabins are bright, clean and modern (no furniture nicks or carpet scruffs) and decorated in warm shades of cream and orangey-red, with two comfortable twin beds that can be pushed together to form a queen. All are equipped with flat-screen televisions with access to daily in-cabin movies as well as a variety of channels (Travel Channel, CNN, etc., dependent on available satellite), a safe, and a mini-bar (loaded with water and sodas, replenished daily).

More than anything, the creature comforts made up for any lack in square footage. We were thrilled to find a fabulously efficient hair dryer, terry bathrobes and fragrant Molton Brown toiletries, all of which come standard in all accommodation categories. We were also happy -- and surprised -- to find that all cabins are also outfitted with alarm clock radios, which are not a part of the package on mainstream cruise ships. You can still request a wake-up call onboard Sapphire -- but it's nice to have the option not to, plus music to boot!

Cabins feature U.S. and European plugs as well as USB ports for charging items while you cruise.

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