Costa Maya (Photo:Roman Stetsyk/Shutterstock)
2017 Top-Rated Western Caribbean & Riviera Maya Destinations
3.5 / 5.0
Cruise Critic Editor Rating

By Cruise Critic Staff

Port of Costa Maya

If you build it, they will come. Costa Maya, located on a peninsula along Mexico's Caribbean coast, about 100 miles south of Playa del Carmen, feels like a private island created from scratch expressly for cruisers. That's because it was; developers created the port terminal/faux village complex not far from the Belize border solely to woo cruise lines, and everything -- from the manmade malecon, a beachfront pedestrian path in nearby Mahahual, to the beach club used for shore excursions -- has been created with passengers in mind.

About Costa Maya


Pro

There are some interesting, lesser-known attractions, including Mayan ruins, within easy reach of the port

Con

Costa Maya's manufactured Caribbean experience might not be much of a draw for experienced cruisers

Bottom Line

This port was purpose-built for cruisers, so it lacks a bit of authentic character


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The port itself, which opened for business in February 2001 and was rebuilt after Hurricane Dean in 2007, features myriad facilities in its village -- pools, restaurants, brand-name bars such as Carlos 'n Charlie's, shops, a dolphin experience and a small beach (though it's too rocky to swim). The port developers also own a club and water sports area on Uvero Beach, which is actually away from the terminal and is typically used by cruise lines as a shore-excursion option. Besides the amenities that tourists see, developers took care of the essentials outside the village -- brick-paved roads, concrete cottages for employees, who all come from elsewhere, and a water-sanitation system. (Yes, it is safe to drink water within the Costa Maya confines.)

Beyond that, the folks who created Costa Maya also invested in and remade Mahahual (also known as Majahual), a one-time fishing village of 200 people that's about a 30-minute walk or $5 cab ride away. An attractive malecon anchors a row of seaside hotels, restaurants, dive shops and beach clubs that serve fresh ceviche and offer water activities along lovely white sand beaches with shallow surf (perfect for families). Although development is restricted to low-rise buildings, Mahahual's growth has attracted a small group of entrepreneurs, including a sizable Italian community, interested in making the town the "next Tulum."

For travelers who just want to get into the "don't worry, be happy" mindset, the lure of the area's beach clubs can pretty much consume the day. Those who want to venture further have intriguing options, too. The region is home to some lesser-known (but still important) Mayan ruins. The site most cruise passengers come here to see is Chacchoben, a city dating to around 350 A.D.; some excursions focus solely on Mayan food and culture. Bacalar lagoon offers kayaking and swimming in the Cenote Azul, and there's also a Spanish fortress you can tour. While Costa Maya might look sleepy at a glance, there's something for everyone in this corner of the Caribbean -- and it only keeps growing.

Where You're Docked

Ships dock right at Costa Maya's purpose-built facilities. While the pier is long, a free shuttle bus ferries passengers back and forth.

Good to Know

Because of the area's small size, Costa Maya and Mahahual have very little crime. The only real hassle are the vendors who walk on the beach (some beach clubs forbid them, but enforcement is lax), but a simple "no gracias" sends them along.

Currency & Best Way to Get Money

The currency is the Mexican peso; check www.xe.com or www.oanda.com for current exchange rates. However, many vendors will gladly accept U.S. currency. There's an ATM in the cruise port area and also in Mahahual, but you might want to have cash on hand before this stop, as few vendors take credit cards.

Language

Spanish is the official language, though English is widely spoken, as most places in the area cater to tourists.

Shopping

While the stores at the port sell the usual trinkets (as do the vendors on the beach, albeit at lower prices), keep your eyes out for colorful Mayan embroidery and textiles, including handkerchiefs, table runners, placemats and dresses.

Best Cocktail

Try any fruity concoction sold in a yard-long plastic tumbler called, appropriately, "la yarda." If three feet of banana daiquiri or strawberry margarita doesn't float your boat, quench your thirst with a few bottles of Bohemia or Sol, the requisite beers.


Costa Maya Awards

Cruisers' Choice Destination Awards

2017 Top-Rated Western Caribbean & Riviera Maya Destinations
2016 Top-Rated Western Caribbean & Riviera Maya Destinations