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Regent Seven Seas Cruises to Eliminate Plastic Water Bottles on All Ships
Vero Water bottles (Photo: Vero Water)

Regent Seven Seas Cruises to Eliminate Plastic Water Bottles on All Ships

Regent Seven Seas Cruises to Eliminate Plastic Water Bottles on All Ships
Vero Water bottles (Photo: Vero Water)

October 10, 2019

Gina Kramer
Contributor
By Gina Kramer
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(11:05 a.m. EST) -- Beginning in spring 2019, Regent Seven Seas Cruises will serve water in reusable glass bottles, replacing traditional plastic water bottles across the fleet. The luxury cruise line has set a goal to eliminate approximately 2 million plastic water bottles annually.
Passengers will be able to choose from Vero-branded still or sparkling water, which uses a proprietary five-stage nanofiltration process to reduce impurities, chemicals and imperfections. An onboard purification and filling system will enable the line to purify, chill and serve Vero water on all its ships.
"Regent is committed to providing an unrivaled experience that includes serving our guests the very best tasting water on their voyage," said the line's president and CEO, Jason Montague. "In addition, the Vero water purification system helps reduce our carbon footprint and sustains our beautiful natural resources."
Vero water will be rolled out in two phases during 2019. The first phase will implement the water service in suites, restaurants, lounges and bars on Seven Seas Voyager (by April 5), Seven Seas Explorer (by April 8), Seven Seas Mariner (by June 5) and Seven Seas Navigator (by June 18).
As part of the second phase, passengers will be provided with their own reusable Vero water bottles that they can use throughout their cruise, including on shore excursions, and even take home with them.
Regent Seven Seas' move toward Vero water is part of a Sail & Sustain environmental program helmed by its parent company, Norwegian Cruise Line Holdings Ltd. The latest announcement comes only two weeks after Regent Seven Seas' sister brand, Oceania, also revealed it would replace plastic bottles with Vero water.
Last year, all three lines under the Norwegian Cruise Line Holdings Ltd. umbrella -- including Norwegian Cruise Line -- eliminated plastic straws from their ships. As of now, Norwegian Cruise Line has no plans to use Vero water on its ships.
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