Alotau Alotau Town Tour Excursion Reviews

We only had very large Kina notes so went to the Westpac bank to get smaller denominations first.
Sail Date: February 2019
We only had very large Kina notes so went to the Westpac bank to get smaller denominations first. We had been there 3 years prior and found the place much improved. There was a large paved area in the town instead of rough bitumen and a ... Read More
We only had very large Kina notes so went to the Westpac bank to get smaller denominations first. We had been there 3 years prior and found the place much improved. There was a large paved area in the town instead of rough bitumen and a few new stores. The area looks quite nice now. We ended up walking back towards the ship to the Alotau International Hotel for a cold drink and to sit in the cool near the water. Read Less
Shore Excursion Provider: Princess Cruises
This was one of the best tours we have ever taken, in spite of the fact that our minivan had no air ...
Sail Date: September 2018
This was one of the best tours we have ever taken, in spite of the fact that our minivan had no air conditioning. Visiting the Secondary School & having a student conduct the tour was the highlight.
This was one of the best tours we have ever taken, in spite of the fact that our minivan had no air conditioning. Visiting the Secondary School & having a student conduct the tour was the highlight. Read Less
Shore Excursion Provider: Princess Cruises
A brief tour, but enjoyed stopping at the local school and having student guides.
Sail Date: October 2017
A brief tour, but enjoyed stopping at the local school and having student guides.
A brief tour, but enjoyed stopping at the local school and having student guides. Read Less
Shore Excursion Provider: Princess Cruises
After three days at sea, we awoke at 7.00 am, just as the Captain was bringing her alongside our ...
Sail Date: September 2016
After three days at sea, we awoke at 7.00 am, just as the Captain was bringing her alongside our berth. Skies very overcast with rain not long ceased, so there were more than a few muddy pools on the quayside. The vista which greeted us ... Read More
After three days at sea, we awoke at 7.00 am, just as the Captain was bringing her alongside our berth. Skies very overcast with rain not long ceased, so there were more than a few muddy pools on the quayside. The vista which greeted us was so similar to many of the West African ports we had visited, and being a Christian country and a Sunday, only the town market was open, many attending the number of churches here in Milne Bay province. Not long after being tied alongside, the local dance tribe performed on the quayside, a small party of about ten mainly men and boys but with two women. This part of the town, being a port had much industry, with oil storage tanks and many containers lined up on the quayside. We were told by our guide Sarah, that there are several ferries leaving from here to the outlying islands. Mustering in the Marquis restaurant, we were "stickered" and after waiting for about ten minutes we were released to the gangway, where we were shepherded to a waiting mini-bus to begin our tour. After the introduction from our guide, Sarah, on where we were visiting, I realised that we were on the wrong tour!! I wasn't to know where the blame lay until I returned to the ship to check what we booked! I suppose there is a first time for everything, but in future I will check thoroughly!! As it turned out, whilst a lot more expensive, it was probably the better option, as we got to go to the lookout, a lovely view over Simpson Bay graced by the presence of Sun Princess a small speck in the distance. From there we went to Cameron Secondary School, which surprisingly enough was most enjoyable and informative. It started with about eight girls singing the Papuan New Guinea National Anthem, unaccompanied, and then each girl was assigned to a small group of passengers who walked us round the school buildings explaining what took place in each of these buildings. It holds 850 students of both sexes, and is for boarders as well as day pupils. The two dormitories separating the sexes are a long way apart, and both are fenced. Needless to say it is forbidden to enter into one another's sleeping quarters, if found there is severe punishment! Alongside the tarmacked road are flowers and shrubs tended by the "naughty" students, and our little girl, Kate who looked about 12, but was actually 20, giggled and said it was looked after mainly by the boys! Kate was unusual in her colouring, having merely a "tan" and with very definitely auburn hair. It was obvious that either her father or mother had been Caucasian. She was very self-assured, spoke perfect English and explained what subjects were taught and telling us that class sizes had about 45 pupils. Leaving the school we retraced our steps, returning to the outskirts of town to visit the market. A little disappointing, maybe being a Sunday there were not many stalls, with many having the same produce, bananas, green vegetables, sago, coconuts, copra and fish, which looked freshly caught, being put on the tables from an iced container, where one person waved a little flag-like stick to keep the flies off. However there were several stalls selling what resembled plaited rope, and we were told it was tobacco. This seemed incongruous, unless it was put in a pipe to smoke. There would need to be quite a lot of preparation to convert this to cigarettes! Adjacent was another building which sold batteries, lighters, kitchen graters, as well as some "cooked" items, and when questioned, said it was shell! The allotted 20 minutes being up we all walked back to the minibus and returned to the ship. One wonders how the money is distributed, as the $AUD115 cost of this two hour trip seemed excessive. Having seen so many places like this on our journey up the west coast of Africa, we were underwhelmed, and the only highlight was the interaction with the schoolgirls from Cameron Secondary School. Read Less
Shore Excursion Provider: Princess Cruises