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1,940 Cuba Cruise Reviews

I have been on many many cruises and I must admit I was skeptical at first, but this cruise to Cuba aboard the Fathom Adonia was fantastic!! First of all going to Cuba was exciting enough, but the cruise experience was beyond my ... Read More
I have been on many many cruises and I must admit I was skeptical at first, but this cruise to Cuba aboard the Fathom Adonia was fantastic!! First of all going to Cuba was exciting enough, but the cruise experience was beyond my expectations . Yes there is no casino and production shows, but after all the touring during the day and a fantastic dinner at night, you are pretty tired! All the excursions are included but a night in Havana optional experience. The tours for all 4 days were exceptional, they included historical sites, cultural experiences, and shopping . The people of Cuba were so welcoming and friendly - I enjoyed every minute of the land tours. Tour guides were exceptional and their English was top notch. The service and food aboard ship definitely surprised- Service was outstanding!!! Food was delicious and varied. The cabins were quite comfortable and the ships décor was beautiful and classy. I would not hesitate to recommend this cruise and would go again!! Read Less
Sail Date June 2016
Fathom's Person to Person cruise to Cuba made this an opportunity not to be missed. The Adonia can accommodate 700 passengers. We were about 400 people on board and this made for an easy-going, uncrowded atmosphere. With its ... Read More
Fathom's Person to Person cruise to Cuba made this an opportunity not to be missed. The Adonia can accommodate 700 passengers. We were about 400 people on board and this made for an easy-going, uncrowded atmosphere. With its English "clubby" atmosphere, dark paneling, over-stuffed chairs in its lounges and beautifully appointed dining areas, ease and comfort abound. Our balcony cabin on A deck was spacious and comfortable. We had two beds, a couch, chairs on the veranda, large closet and storage areas and a perfectly acceptable bathroom, although the shower is small. Jessica, our attendant, made every effort to answer questions and meet our every need. I often used the showers in the spa because they were larger and available after swimming in the refreshing and at times uncrowded pool. Meals were delicious and a great variety was offered each day. Fresh fruits and vegetables always were provided in abundance. BBQ lunches on the pool deck created a festive atmosphere. The shore excursions provided us the opportunity to see three cities in Cuba via air conditioned buses. The guides were informative, friendly and approachable. We were always encouraged to ask questions and speak with people we met along the way. The architecture and antique cars of Havana, the historical plazas, the maintained buildings in Cienfuegos and the fortress and cemetery in Santiago de Cuba demonstrated the treasures of our neighbor island. Take advantage of visiting Cuba before McDonald's and Starbucks change the atmosphere! Wonderful cruise to a wonderful country. Read Less
Sail Date June 2016
The Fathom Adonia is a beautiful ship. The staterooms were acceptable but the operation, crew and food were one star if that! 1. Upon arriving at the dock the representative had no P.A. system and was yelling out instructions of how ... Read More
The Fathom Adonia is a beautiful ship. The staterooms were acceptable but the operation, crew and food were one star if that! 1. Upon arriving at the dock the representative had no P.A. system and was yelling out instructions of how they wanted us to board the ship . Since no one could hear him this created much confusion. 2. When the ship departed there was no sail away party. Just we were underway. 3. The food o on the Buffet area was so poor that you had to read the signs to figure out what it was The order of selecting food was NO ORDER. You had to cross over to get hot food. The carving station was general closed. 4. At dinner I ordered Strip Steak, I was presented with roast beef on another night I asked for veal and got pork. 5. For the diabetic there was never any deserts put out. I asked for sugar free and twenty minute latter it showed up. However when I ate this sugar free deserts my sugar level shot up to over 200. You can figure that out. 6. Menus at the bar never had what was printed in them. I was told they were mistakes in the menu....... 7. The staff in my opinion paid more attention to themselves then entertaining the passengers. 8. The entertainment was an English band that played music form the 80's and the majority of the passengers were over 70. They did have a great Cuban group on for a day from Havana. 9. A major sticking point with me is seeing members of the crew (officers) drink. Sorry I don't care if they are off duty. In an emergency everyone of them need a clear head. 10. Also with the crew many of them needed to be instructed as to how to wear their uniforms. The shirts on some of the officers looked like they needed to be laundered and press. Many of the officers couldn't even get their name tags on correctly and far be if they spoke to you. Saw the Captain ONCE in port and she shot by.not even acknowledging the passengers. 11. They would have the band playing on the pool deck before the ship sailed but they stopped playing right before we got under way when the people came out on deck. 12 Speaking about the pool the pool deck was so HOT that you could not walk on it bare foot. Hey fathom they make plastic mates for that problem!. 13. Breakfast was the same for seven days! Most of the staff would walk by you in the buffet/lido restaurant . The only staff that would assist people have problems were the Filipino staff 14. Finally I paid $199.00 to see a show in Havana through the cruise line If I went I my own it would of cost about $60. I believe in profit but not rip off Read Less
Sail Date June 2016
Was interested in going to Cuba and thought this would be a good way, and the price was right since it is the summer. Read the few reviews I could find and they were helpful. This is not your typical cruise experience. Smaller ship, ... Read More
Was interested in going to Cuba and thought this would be a good way, and the price was right since it is the summer. Read the few reviews I could find and they were helpful. This is not your typical cruise experience. Smaller ship, no casino and no big shows in the evening. i brought plenty of reading material and after a day of walking and being out in the sun, didn't mind it at all. Bring bottles of water with you. They have one in your room and you get one on the days you have excursions. But it is hot and you need more. They charge a lot for soda, but I don't drink that so I was okay. I did bring a bottle of wine, as did my traveling partner. Arrived about an hour past beginning of embarkation and was very quick. Not a long wait time at all. Had a balcony cabin. Small, but most ship cabins are small. Space was sufficient. The excursions were good. Guides knowledgable, especially in Havana. Wasn't thrilled with caliber of guides in Santiago de Cuba and Cienfuegos. No air-conditioning anywhere in Cuba, so it is hot. Carry lots of tissues as many of the restrooms don't have toilet paper. And you need change of the restrooms as you have to pay all the time!! Food on the ship was okay. Im a vegetarian/pescatarian. Had a harder time in Cuba since they eat a lot of meat, but I managed and told the staff in each pleader/restaurant and they tried to be accommodating. Staff on the ship don't have much experience, very young and they don't really mingle with the passengers. I found them always eating together or hanging out at night together. They need to work on their customer service - so don't have high expectations. The dance classes were good. The band on the ship was mediocre. They play the same set over and over ago. Get's old. The bands that came on board in Cuba were amazing. They should get more Cuban entertainment on board. I did take yoga classes on the ship .Other classes like pilates and spinning charged a fee. The first excursion in Havana was a walking tour. Was with the group until after lunch and then went off on my own. They really should divide buses into walking ability. Some older people had difficulty walking and were very slow, or they had canes. Second day bus tour was good. Spent a bit too much time at the cemetery, but lucked out with seeing Fusterland. It is totally random where you will end up. And also can tell the guides it is time to move on - sometimes they need a push. Cienfeugos lovely, but not enough time there. Santiago de Cuba was perfect for the one day. It is dirtier here and people begin - what I thought Havana would be like. Havana was super clean and the people were lovely. Read Less
Sail Date June 2016
Cabin: D021 ;Our cabin size was good, but you will want to stay on the other side of the ship if you want to see the ports upon entry. This was not a big deal to us since my husband is into photography and took pictures up on deck anyway. ... Read More
Cabin: D021 ;Our cabin size was good, but you will want to stay on the other side of the ship if you want to see the ports upon entry. This was not a big deal to us since my husband is into photography and took pictures up on deck anyway. If you get sea-sick you will want to stay on this floor because the rocking is decreased. We were right outside the elevators, but did not hear any loud noises or noise that woke us up. Very good insulation from noise. Food: We did breakfast at the buffet each day and lunch and dinner at Anderson's (sit down style and included in price). We choose to have lunches at a table for 2, but did dinners at group tables. We only had 1 bad dinner group (very quiet and negative bunch). Otherwise, we met amazing people and had a good time. We did not eat at the addt'l cost restaurant based upon reviews and fellow travelers. General consensus was it was not worth the up-charge. Havana: The best of the ports by far. Make the most of your time by staying out late during your 1-night stopover. Head over to the Malecon at night, go to a local restaurant (or 2) for drinks and snacks. You're only here 1 night and it's the most "immersive" experience of the whole trip. We did not pay for the extra excursions. People said Tropicana was amazing, but I already know that Vegas style shows are not for me. If you like them, then go. It sounds like you'll love it. Don't do the "old-car" excursion through Fathom. You'll save half the cost with the guys right outside the customs house. Some people did private tours on Day 1 (after the Fathom walking tour) and they all had great things to say. I wish I would have thought to plan for that. General Tips for all Ports: You can disembark whenever you want. You don't need to listen for your group to be called. They only do it for crowd control and even that does not work because the majority of people in the first group do not go when called. So, walk down to disembark as soon as possible and you can exchange your money without waiting AND you can also find out where the tour groups are going (aside from Day 1 in Havana each group will have a set of stops + 1 unique stop; you want to get with the group that is going on the "unique stop" that interests you). Also, the people disembarking in the beginning tend to be more mobile so you don't have to worry about being with a slower group. Cienfuego's (1/2 day) and Santiago de Cuba (8 hrs): You will be rushed in these 2 ports. Unless the ship changes their schedule and/or shortens some stops or eliminates others, there is no way around this. Overall: I'm glad we took this trip as an overview to Cuba. If we go back again (too many places to see in the world!) we will do Havana again and one of the beach towns with snorkeling. We loved learning the history on this trip (um, be aware that it will be glossed over). English proficiency is hit or miss - not that I blame this on a Spanish speaking country - so learn some basic Spanish if you want to go out on your own. Just making an attempt at speaking Spanish will go a long way. Read Less
Sail Date June 2016
We were on the ships 5th sailing to Cuba. This was a great way to visit Cuba. However, if you want a great cruise ship experience, this is not the ship for you. This cruise is definitely about Cuba. We were on a sailing in late ... Read More
We were on the ships 5th sailing to Cuba. This was a great way to visit Cuba. However, if you want a great cruise ship experience, this is not the ship for you. This cruise is definitely about Cuba. We were on a sailing in late June. It was exceeding hot in Cuba at this time. We walked a lot, and buildings do not have a/c or fans. Be advised that most restroom facilities do not have toilet seats, toilet paper, and many do not flush. You pay an attendant to give you a single square of tissue paper. Often she comes in when you are finished, and pours a bucket of water to flush the toilet. Bring extra tissue with you! Keep extra CUC's (or dollars) with you to use facilities!!!! The cruise director, Collin, his wife, and staff were all personable and did a good job. They are new to the cruise industry. They really wanted their passengers to experience Cuba and have a good time. We had lunch with Collin on one of the tours and really enjoyed talking with him. Discussions held in the ship were informative. We were glad we attended a few of those. I especially was interested in the session about Cuban religion. (The first presentation they had done on the subject). In the future, it would be informative to have sessions on the cigar industry, more history talks, etc. The shore excursions were good. I hope in the future there will be more flexibility and choices (i.e.- art or music selections, visit a cigar factory). I understand why it is set up this way initially, but I do hope with time and experience, these can be expanded. We had very good experiences, tour guides, and visited some very good restaurants and paladars. As excursions are included in the cost of the cruise, you don't get to select which sites to visit, it is he luck of the draw. Groups are at different art or music sites and different restaurants/paladars. We were at a restaurant with about 4 other tour groups. It was crowded, slow, and very hot. We were on about the 3rd floor and sitting outdoors. The food was fine. Not great, but it was fine. I had a lobster tail and my husband had chicken. Our friend ordered the fish, but it wasn't cooked through, so he could not eat it. We did have 3 drinks included with the meal. ( A bottle of water and soda, sangria, or beer.) You are encouraged to tour on your own on the first day in Havanna, after the group walking tour concludes. We separated from our group right after lunch. (Before tour ended). Our group of four followed a local into an delapadated building and bought cigars. (that was an experience in itself). We then went with a local on a ride in a '48 Ford and took a tour of Havanna and visited a small, local bar, where we had mojitos. This was the best part of our trip. We walked to a rum / cigar store just down the street from the port. A local American told us that was a good place to make our purchases. We were not sure of the quality of cigars we purchased from the local in that building. We later learned someone else had their cigars that they purchased on the street confiscated, but we did not have any problems. The only excursion we purchased was the Tropicana on the first night in Havanna. This probably could have been done independently easy enough. The show was very enjoyable. It was all outdoors, but we were lucky with weather that evening. We were served a bottle of rum for 4 of us. a can of cola each, and a bowl of nuts. Be sure to have dinner beforehand. I believe they did have a dinner menu, but I did not notice anyone eating. We had almost a full bottle of rum left, but left it on the table. Others brought theirs back to the ship with no problem. Day 2 in Havanna was a bus tour. This was a much better tour. We had a great trip to a neighborhood an artist is renovating. We also visited a cemetery, We went to a paladar that was really good. It was in an area that looked very run down, but this building was being renovated (they were literally working on the outside of the building. Again, lobster was on the menu, and it was very good here. The others at our table all really liked their lunch. A loaf of Cuban bread was brought to our table. It was so good, we asked for more. We were told no, but we said we would pay for it. We were brought a large loaf, served with chopped tomatoes, butter, and olive oil. We ate the entire thing, as it was delicious! The tour continued with a visit to an art museum, which lasted too long. The tour concluded with a trip to a market, which was crowded, vendors selling the same items in different stalls. Our day in Cienfuegos included a stop at a park that had art sculptures. The buildings in this town were very well cared for. We did stop and walked to a concert at a hall. The music was beautiful. However, we seated upstairs, where it was miserably hot. We were so uncomfortable, we just could not enjoy th performance as we should have. The day in Santiago de Cuba included a stop at a local grocery store and a department type store. We walked through a busy area of the town. It was really interesting. Our group visited a small building where a music group performed for us. They were very talented singers. Again, it was so hot in the building, it really distracted from the performance. We were the first group to ever eat at the paladar we visited outside of town. The family and staff were all introduced. The owner looked so proud, as she should have been!! It was really sweet. The food here was really good! There was an abundance of it served. We were given keychains with the name of the place as a token gift from the owner. Talking with others back on the ship, we seemed to have gotten very lucky with the places where we ate each day. We were served lobster twice, others never had the option at all. The Adonis has recently been renovated. They have done a beautiful job renovating her! The public areas are just beautiful. The gym, library, and other public areas are very nice. This was our 15th cruise. We also took a Carribean cruise on another line the following week, so it is easy to make comparisons, Food and service were both lacking on this ship. We had a difficult time and had to make repeat requests for more bars of soap and shampoo later in the cruise. (What the heck?!!). One day, she forgot to leave bath towels for us. I found a hat, a bra, hairspray, and toothpaste all left in our cabin from a precious cruise (ugh!). Much of the food served was Cuban or Dominican Republic based. Especially so in the specialty restaurant. We had reservations for 2 nights, but cancelled the second reservation after dining there once, it was good, but not worth paying to eat there a second night, The dining room food was fine, not great. They did not offer a standard selection of chicken, steak, basic salads, etc. as other ships do. I think this was a big mistake, as there was one night, I was hard pressed to find something to order for dinner. One night, I just ordered 3 appetizers, as nine of the dinner selections appealed to me. I liked the choice of ordering Cuban or DR food, but just would have preferred the standard, daily menu for back up. The food in the Lido appeared to be the same food offered in the dining room each evening. However, we never had dinner up there. It was all My Time Dining. This worked out great for timing and excursions, and meeting new people. However, you miss the benefit of a waiter who knows you. Dining service was not impressive. It wasn't poor, it just wasn't top notch. The swimming pool was especially small. It was busy every sea day. They did have good music by the pool, which we enjoyed! This ship serves 700 passengers. This was a good size ship for Cuban ports. I can't imagine a larger ship being accommodated in Cuba. I just don't see them being able to handle a larger group of passengers in restaurants or other local facilities. Apparently, R.C. Empress of the Seas has plans to sail there with 2,000 passengers in the near future. I would definitely recommend the smaller Fathom Adonis. Generally speaking, most passengers we talked to were very well traveled and had cruised before. We all expected more from the ship itself. Food and service were a huge disappointment. Both could easily be improved upon. Just because passengers are doing a mission trip to DR or visiing Cuba, does not mean we don't want good service on a ship. Read Less
Sail Date June 2016
I chose this cruise because of the experiences it promised. Unfortunately I paid a fortune for this terrible experience. I didn't get to see half of what they promised and spent my time in the ports being shuffled on and off a but ... Read More
I chose this cruise because of the experiences it promised. Unfortunately I paid a fortune for this terrible experience. I didn't get to see half of what they promised and spent my time in the ports being shuffled on and off a but without seeing half of what they promised. One of the busses in Santagio ate at a restraurant that made everybody on the bus sick and were told that was the risk they took going to cuba. The tour guides spoke little English and were unable to contribute much. Also each tour bus did something different! They went to different places and ate at different quality restraurants. The ship was no better! The food in the restraurant was terrible and everything was covered in the same brown gravey on they gave it different names every night. The cruise was half full and the staff was not friendly or attentive. The cruise even ran out of coke a cola for its cubra libra's! I paid full price for the cruise which no sells for $200 $800 or $1500 a person! Even at that not worth it. You are better off waiting for the other cruise line to start to go to cuba~ Read Less
Sail Date July 2016
Almost all the "People to People" tours start at $4000 per person. An incredible discount price offered to Florida residents in the heat of summer (I guess we are use to it), convinced us that this was a can't miss ... Read More
Almost all the "People to People" tours start at $4000 per person. An incredible discount price offered to Florida residents in the heat of summer (I guess we are use to it), convinced us that this was a can't miss opportunity. And it was. It is impossible to separate the overall experience which was wonderful from the cruise ship experience which, with little effort, could have been better. The ship, the former Renaissance 8, is similar in configuration to to the older Oceania ships. Public rooms are still spacious, beautifully finished and more intimate than the giant behemoths at sea these days. The cabins have ample storage space though not much room to move around or dine-in. Bathrooms are quite tight with small sinks. Balconies and built-in furniture show signs of age. But you won't spend much time there anyway. There are lectures, films, dance lessons, Spanish lessons, self-exploration groups, spa treatments and just plain hanging by the pool. There are NO casinos, or glitzy shows. The shops were pleasant, but lacked imagination. Though the watches and jewels were the exception, neither the crafts, nor the tee shirts were attractive, unusual or Cuba-specific. Our shore experiences were top notch. Be aware that Adonia has NO control over the guide you will get....tours are run by Havanatour and the quality varies widely from a history professor with in-depth military background to recent grad spouting Socialist government scripts she memorized yesterday. Nevertheless, everyone saw and did whatever was important to see and do in the ports we visited. Adonia deserves HIGH praise for getting people off and on the ship with maximum efficiency. Not a second of your time is wasted! The "people to people" experiences included music, dance, art, and street conversations. I must warn that many of those experiences result in the donation of money (in any denomination and currency) from passengers to Cubans. Though discouraged by the Cuban government, many cannot survive without tips, gifts, donations and just plain old begging. Lunches ashore were much better than expected. Unfortunately, the same cannot be said of the food aboard. The first few days were unbearable. Adonia needs to seriously upgrade their cooking. The dining service and staff were excellent except for the specialty dining. There were few offerings that appealed to us at the Ocean Grill anyway so unless you must have a steak, save your $$. Lastly, high praise for the award winning band and all the impact guides who were knowledgeable and personable. We especially enjoyed the dance instructors Deb and Doug who had infinite patience and were great fun. You will learn Salsa for sure Read Less
Sail Date July 2016
we were on the 4th or so sailing to cuba on the adonia. the crew is a mixture of cruise line employees and the new impact travel people (mostly ex peace corp ). this may have caused some breakin period but it did not affect a great trip. ... Read More
we were on the 4th or so sailing to cuba on the adonia. the crew is a mixture of cruise line employees and the new impact travel people (mostly ex peace corp ). this may have caused some breakin period but it did not affect a great trip. first the ship. the adonia is small - 700 passengers but did not lack for anything. they had a house band from england (maybe a contract holdover) and they brought a local cuban band aboard. all service food dining areas public areas all on a par with say a princess level. alot of activity on board were not well attended. again i think that the new non cruise people were in charge - there was not a typical cruise director. but you go on the cuba leg for the shore experience. 2 nights in havana, cienfuegos and santiago. the trips were well organized and gave you a real feel for how cuba works economically and socially. this s a cant miss trip Read Less
Sail Date July 2016
WE chose this cruise in order to be in Cuba before the great rush and also to be able to use the internet . There is a fairly steep charge for the internet. We spent $135.00. We wanted to see Cuba before the big infusion of capital and ... Read More
WE chose this cruise in order to be in Cuba before the great rush and also to be able to use the internet . There is a fairly steep charge for the internet. We spent $135.00. We wanted to see Cuba before the big infusion of capital and tourists needed now that Russia and Venezuela are no longer subsidizing the country. One picture is worth a thousand words. Seventy years of socialism has yielded a salary of $25.00 per month plus a ration booklet. for the college educated. Education is free, but it is a dead end! The guides were great and we learned a lot. The ten large suites on the ship are very pleasant. The other cabins are small. You can check the size on the web site. There are no amenities for the suite occupants common on other cruises. They give you one large bottle of water even though you are paying two to three times what the people in the cabins are paying. There is a charge of $25.00 per person to use the alternative restaurant, the Ocean Grill. The food there is worse than the dining room, though the service is great. The head waiter really tries but the menu and orders to the chef on how to cook the food is no good. There really is no fresh fish even though they are in Miami every week.....The so called lobster was inedible...dry and spongy .The chocolate mousse dessert was cold,hard and dry and nothing like mousse. In fact the menu descriptions often had little to do with the actual food. The main dining room was slightly better if you spent a great deal of effort . Again the restaurant manager was a gem as were his staff, but it appears they are constrained by directions from abroad and do not have quality ingredients with which to work. The lunch menus were terrible. You can buy soft drinks for two dollars at the bar and wine by the glass for $7-15.00. There are no free drinks even at the sail away"parties" or at meals. It was all very strange considering we paid as much as we usually pay on Silversea, Seaborne and Regent. They were mostly inspired by Caribe food based on jumbled up ingredients which were mostly filler. Even the hamburgers were inedible....They had so much filler it was not even a hamburger, The hot dogs were even poor quality.. There was very little Spanish spoken and no real effort to increase language skill even though it was advertised to be a part of the cruise. On the last full sea day there was not even one Spanish class. On the day they had two Spanish class they conflicted with meetings to discuss the Cuban tours the following day. There was only one history lecture. None of the cruise staff seemed to care. Read Less
Sail Date August 2016
The primary reason to take this cruise is, of course, to go to Cuba before it gets overrun by Americans. The Adonia is a fantastic ship. The amenities and crew are top rate. With only a passenger load of 704 people you make new friends ... Read More
The primary reason to take this cruise is, of course, to go to Cuba before it gets overrun by Americans. The Adonia is a fantastic ship. The amenities and crew are top rate. With only a passenger load of 704 people you make new friends very easy. Cubans are a welcoming people ready to receive Americans and share their views of their country. Of course there are two distinct points of view very pro Cuba and those who want to leave. But are are welcoming and friendly. I recommend this cruise to all cruisers who want something different, exciting and informative. When I booked this cruise I dod not know what to expect, and with it being booked as a people to people cruise to a country where time has stood still I have some concerns. The crew and the Cubans themselves resolved any concerns I had. The only major draw back is that all transactions have to be made in CUC pesos as they do not accept US $ and have no inter-structure to handle credit cards. Talk to the people and they will help even if they do to speak English. Do this cruise I know I will return to do it again. Read Less
Sail Date August 2016
We took the 9th Fathom cruise to Cuba and really enjoyed the experience. The cruise itself was excellent. The ship only accommodates 700 passengers so it is a very pleasant size. The ship is in good shape and the crew and all staff were ... Read More
We took the 9th Fathom cruise to Cuba and really enjoyed the experience. The cruise itself was excellent. The ship only accommodates 700 passengers so it is a very pleasant size. The ship is in good shape and the crew and all staff were truly excellent. The staff is very friendly and courteous. The food was very good. Being a small ship there is not much in the way of entertainment. The information sessions were good though still quite superficial. Their whole personal discovery shtick is a little irritating if that is not your thing but you don't have to get into that.. There is not a lot to see in the ports visited. Havana is run down and poor.The absence of restoration since the 1960s means that there is not too much to see in the 4 squares you visit. Cienfuegos was the most fun port. The ground tour company Havantur is hit and miss. We had a great guide, Israel, on Day1 . His English was good, he was knowledgeable and could be understood. Other groups were less fortunate with guides whose English is poor , have accents that are difficult to follow and who just have not studied the history adequately. That was our fate on Day 2 in Havana. They are trying to scale up but don't yet have the staff they need. Tip: if you get assigned a lousy guide in Havana try attaching to another group. There is some flexibility to do so in that city with everyone going to the same places.The busses are modern and in excellent condition and the drivers were all very good. It is blisteringly hot and muggy in August. Most of the venues are not air conditioned so the days onshore can be brutal. Tip : take a cooling towel. Earlier reviews mentioned that there was no water so we took a case of bottled water. Fathom has corrected for that and so a bottle of water is given to each bus passenger and there was water dockside when we returned to the ship. Take half a case. The money is confusing. We changed a couple of hundred dollars on arrival and that worked out fine for cigars rum and curios and daily tips. Try to get small bills when you exchange. You can change at each port and there was no problem converting back as we departed from Santiago. There is tax on US dollars so for best value exchange for Euros Canadian Dollars or Sterling. The Person to Person encounters are really just listening to local musicians in the community. Very entertaining and good quality. But not educational or informative on the true society. There is still strong government influence on what can be shown or discussed. In Havana and Santiago there are 2 hour lunch stops. The food and music were ok but hardly representative of what the locals get to eat. The basic Fathom excursions don't get you out of the cities and into the countryside or to the beaches. They are city tours. Buying cigars( you are allowed $100 per person in tobacco and alcohol combined ) was frustrating. The tour company takes you to places they have an interest in and we found those prices inflated. You have to buy in government approved shops and it is all controlled. We found the best prices in Cienfuegos or the Arts and Crafts market in Havana. Tip: disembark early each morning if you want to improve chances of being assigned to a bus with fewer physically challenged passengers that slow everything down. Overall while not exceeding our expectations and being a little disappointing because there is potential for it to be so much more, we are glad we did this cruise and enjoyed it. We were happy to go early before it changes a lot. When this opens up to multiple cruise lines and the airlines it is going to get crazy and Cuba is not geared up for it. The ship, staff and cruise part of our trip were all excellent. Read Less
Sail Date August 2016
I like everyone else wanted to see Cuba before the hoards of people and the big hotel chains come to Cuba. I was not disappointed. In fact I was very pleased with what i was able to see and do. The biggest take away was the cleanness of ... Read More
I like everyone else wanted to see Cuba before the hoards of people and the big hotel chains come to Cuba. I was not disappointed. In fact I was very pleased with what i was able to see and do. The biggest take away was the cleanness of the cities ( no graffiti ), the warmness and energy of the people, the food, the music and the resilience of a nation that has had a very hard time over the last 50 years. I was also very satisfied with the ship and the staff. The tours were well organized for the time allowed for Fathom to set this up. Truly a great experience and I highly recommend this trip for anyone who wants to see the real Cubans. Another great thing about this cruise was you were able to have free time to do as you pleased, take a cab ride in one of those old cars, go to a local dinner and in a very safe atmosphere. Read Less
Sail Date August 2016
Cuba was one of those bucket list destinations. The Fathom cruise was enticing because it was convenient (we live in Florida), relatively inexpensive as compared to Cuba group excursions and the fact that each night we were "at ... Read More
Cuba was one of those bucket list destinations. The Fathom cruise was enticing because it was convenient (we live in Florida), relatively inexpensive as compared to Cuba group excursions and the fact that each night we were "at home" on a cruise ship. Consider this as all inclusive travel package: transportation, accommodation, dining and excursions were all included in the cruise fare. If you are familiar with the "R" ships you'll feel at home on the Adonia (R8). If you choose there is a planned excursion every day in Cuba. The alternative is independent touring. The excursion staff were enthusiastic. Disabuse the fact that there is any Person-to-Person interaction with the Cubans. Most of our time was spent on tour and if you consider time with a Cuban guide that's pretty much the extent of any P2P interaction. Dining on board is hit-or-miss. They try a little too hard to be exotic and some of the food is a fail. They really need to dial it back and have some less inventive but familiar fare. All in all it was a great first look at Cuba and we'd do it all again. Read Less
Sail Date August 2016
Cuba was on our bucket list, and we wanted to see it before all the changes. We were prepare with all our paperwork visas and passports. We found out that we needed to check the people to people box AND the on your own box. That way ... Read More
Cuba was on our bucket list, and we wanted to see it before all the changes. We were prepare with all our paperwork visas and passports. We found out that we needed to check the people to people box AND the on your own box. That way if we wanted to get off the tour we could and explore on our own. Rent a car and see Havana, it is worth it. The people are very friendly and well educated a lot of people can speak English. They practice their English and it quite fun. LOVED CUBA AND WOULD GO BACK. The BOAT I am so sad for it. They are not keeping it clean and fixed. Rust everywhere, We took this boat when it was Princess and it was one of our best trips. Now this was the worst boat we have every been on. This was our 43 sailing (we are not beginners). Our room was nice and our cabin steward was great. Other fellow passengers did not have the same good experience with their rooms. The food was horrible. I had read reviews and thought those were picky people. That was not the case. On the days we were in port there was no buffet, just a few dishes at the outdoor grill. The girl Tia was wonderful to me and my husband and cooked us hamburger patties each day. We ate in the main dining room one night. I asked for a certain table, our one from the last trip. The head of the dining room said ok, but would not seat us at that table, ok I didn't say anything. We sat at the table and notice there was a hair in the butter. I quietly handed it to the waiter and he said oh, picked it out dropped the hair on the floor and put the butter back on the table. The food was very dry. The menu was very limited. I went to the bar and asked for ice, the second time I asked for ice, the bartender said don't come back here ask for room service. (I was needing big cubes not crushed like up stairs) Room service charges $5.00 service charge. Found that out the hard way. The mirrors in the elevator were always dirty same spots for days. People coming back from tours, hot and sweaty and leaned on the mirrors. The lamp post in the back of the ship needs fixing on the stern side if anyone cares. I really hate to see the ship go bad because lack of paying attention to details. Lots of fellow passengers had the same feeling about the food and cleanliness of the ship. The tours were the best. The food on the tours was great, Cuba does have great food just ask around for were is the best place. Some of the tours didn't get as good of food as we did. The guides were great and very knowledgeable. We all felt very safe and enjoyed the tours. Left the tour on the first day as I found a museum I wanted to see. There was no problem. The price of the cruise is high Hope more ships start traveling to Cuba it is a great place to see. It has the French, Spanish and latin American flare together. Read Less
Sail Date September 2016
I have always wanted to go to Cuba. Probably because we have done business in many of the islands and have met some wonderful people. The people of Cuba are very friendly, coming up to you in the street to ask where you are from and some ... Read More
I have always wanted to go to Cuba. Probably because we have done business in many of the islands and have met some wonderful people. The people of Cuba are very friendly, coming up to you in the street to ask where you are from and some even exchanged their name and address with us. As for the ship it is a means to get to where you want to go. It is your hotel. I think the staff on the ship did an excellent job. I read complaints about the small rooms. We had a balcony room and it was fine for us. We have been cruising since 1982 and have sailed with most of the cruise lines in the USA and Europe. On this ship the bed was very comfortable. The room and shower clean. They supply shampoo, conditioner, gel soap, hard soap, body lotion, etc. What else do you want? Then I read the complaints about the food. I thought the food was very good and a big variety. Remember they have to stock the ship with everything from Miami, they can NOT buy anything in Cuba. The people are on rations for rice, beans, water, etc. So there is nothing extra for a ship to purchase. I would think that after seeing the food shops with hardly anything in them for people to eat, we would stop all the whining. Tours: You will get a Disembarkation Arrangement notice in your room the night before the tour. It will have your group name on it, our was "travel". They will announce the name of your group when it is time for you to meet and to pass through immigration. Old Havana Walking Tour with lunch- is interesting and also long, when you get off the ship in the terminal they are giving out a bottle of free water, take it, you will need it. Also bring a hat. The food at the lunch stop is very good I had the lobster and they didn't charge us for the Mojito's or any other drinks. You're in Havana overnight so you can stay in town if you like and have dinner. Our tour guide spoke pretty good english, as she was learning. She was very sweet. Cienfuegos is also a nice tour. They have water on the bus for free. The performers in the Tomas Terry Theatre are excellent singers. We took the walk up to the tower which is regular stairs to a roof top, you can go up the spiral staircase if you want to but the roof top is also nice for photo's. Lunch here is also very good I had the baked chicken, they didn't charge us for any of the (rum and cokes) drinks. Our tour guide was very good and told us a lot of stories. Explore the Magic of Santiago with lunch-Pearl of the South- This is a beautiful place. We went to the Fort. I would of liked to spend more time in Revolution Square. The lunch was a buffet. You get one soda or water for free and if you want anything else you are charged for it. Our tour guide is a english teacher and very funny. The Tour Guides give you a good idea of life in Cuba. Its hard for sure...... If you have trouble walking I would suggest you go on the bus tours anyway. You can just stay on the bus in the a/c, but you will get to see a lot of the island and hear about the culture and history. You will be able to have lunch which I think you will enjoy. All of the restaurants had musicians. There are some activities on the ship you can pay for but most of them are free. Disembarkation is confusing and needs to be color coded and checked by the staff so people have to go by their assigned times off the ship. Seems no one was paying attention and everyone just tried to get off at the first call. We may go back in May. If we do I think we will hire a driver and go to some places on our own. I noticed people doing that, some which have been to Cuba before. Hemingway's house was closed on this trip. The Floridity Bar (Hemingway's) wasn't opened yet, it was to early. There are many people from other countries just wondering around and having fun. Some with maps some with private tour guides. Read Less
Sail Date September 2016
We picked the cruise in order to see Cuba before it changes into another overrun tourist destination. We went on the 10th week that the ship has been to Cuba. The Adonia is a very well appointed 5 year old ship. The lounges (with fake ... Read More
We picked the cruise in order to see Cuba before it changes into another overrun tourist destination. We went on the 10th week that the ship has been to Cuba. The Adonia is a very well appointed 5 year old ship. The lounges (with fake fireplaces), the library, and two of the dinning rooms are beautiful. There is a good exercise room that had several machines not working when I was there. The cabins are very comfortable and seemed large enough. The food is very average. Some items were good and some were bad. The first night I ate at the Pacific Restaurant I had a fried snapper roll that was very strange. I had a piece of salmon at lunch in the same restaurant that had no taste at all. The rolls at dinner were dry. The dinner buffet at the Conservatory is better because if you don't like something you can have something else. That is unfortunate because sitting around a table in the Pacific Restaurant you get to know other people on the cruise. The service in that restaurant was OK, but only OK. We discovered, from another passenger the last night, that we could have asked for salmon if we did not like the choice of entrées - but no one every informed us of that. The buffet breakfasts were a little reminiscent of the free breakfasts at chain hotels in the US, but a little better. There were very few breakfast psalteries. The bagels and rolls were dry and tasteless - I can't imagine that they were not frozen. The grits were completely tasteless even with the chees added. The breakfast in the Ocean Pacific restaurant was better, but still had be compressed fried hash browns that McDonald sells.The food on the river cruises that we have taken in Europe (Viking and Grand Circle) were far better. No cokes, beer, or wine was included in any meals. he cost for drinks is at the high end for US restaurants and there were no drink packages or "happy hour" with reduced drinks. We did not try the extra cost Ocean Grill because we ran into a couple who had tried it and said it was not worth the $25. The cheapest internet access is $18.75 per day and is slow. There is no cell service once you leave Miami. We did have a lifeboat safety briefing, but never met the captain or were introduced to the crew. There was no "captain's table" that we saw. We were never offered a tour of the bridge or kitchen as some ships do. The biggest problem is on the ground in Cuba. We received virtually no information on what we were doing. We are used to the river cruises in Europe that provide detailed itineraries before you leave home. We missed the orientation talk about Cuba that was held on the first night because we were not aware that the only information announcing them was in The Soundings, a daily newspaper with schedules that is put in the room once a day. There is a TV in the rooms, but no channel has the ship or shore activity schedule. One channel has information on the water temperature and the other a bow camera that was on occasionally. We did get the Fathom smartphone app but found it useless. It always indicated that our tour was the week of August 21st (it was September 4) and one lecture was the wrong time. The tours in Cuba were very poor. Whether this because of the state owned tour service is not known. Some guides spoke only passable English while one was much better. There was little "people-to-people' stuff. We went to a "community center" in Havana that I never was sure the purpose of - maybe to give the tourists something to do. We were never taken to a cigar factory, a school, a hospital, or a grocery store. The 3 lunches we had in Cuba were only so-so and took up a lot of time. A guide to Cuba that I bought from the US was more helpful than some of the Cuban guides. The only couple we talked to on the ship who did something meaningful hired one of the 1950s US cars on their own for a 4 hour tour of Havana. They said it was great and cost about $10 an hour after negotiating. There were several young people in blue Fathom t-shirts whose function I never understood except to give us an occasional talk on the ship. The instructions as to how to get back to the bus in one of the cities was very poor. I'm glad that I went, but did not learn much about Cuba. Read Less
Sail Date September 2016
We chose the Adonia because it was the only ship we found that sailed from a US port to Cuba. Fathom is the new line in the Carnival family. She sails only two itineraries -- Cuba one week and the Dominican Republic the next. Their ... Read More
We chose the Adonia because it was the only ship we found that sailed from a US port to Cuba. Fathom is the new line in the Carnival family. She sails only two itineraries -- Cuba one week and the Dominican Republic the next. Their cruises are unlike any cruise we've sailed previously in that they call at only island and concentrate on 'impact' travel. Their definition of 'impact' is helping to change and improve the communication between peoples. In Cuba, that means striking up conversations with local people whenever and wherever you can -- not a particular easy thing in the ports, other than Havana. I was disappointed by the amount of information available from Fathom prior to the cruise. Their instructions for completing the appropriate forms was scanty and confusing. Phone calls to the line for clarification were non-productive. The phone staff didn't really seem to understand the instructions either. The website description for the various tours is poor, and the information I received on the phone was inaccurate. Perhaps with time, these difficulties will improve -- I would hope so. I found those difficulties to be unusual in the Carnival family. We've not sailed from Miami previously, and found the port a bit confusing. The Adonia sailed from "J" -- parking was readily available and quite plentiful. Except for the relatively high cost, we had no objections to the parking area -- a multi-level garage with more than enough spaces on the first two levels to accommodate all who drove. The check-in and boarding went well and cabins were available when we boarded. It took little time for our luggage to arrive. Our stewardess arrived promptly to introduce herself and offer any assistance we needed. The ship is 'borrowed' from P&O Lines and retained the very good P&O staff. The ship is beautiful -- small (about 700 passengers), well decorated public rooms, lovely dining room... The public rooms on the ship were lovely. Lots of beautiful woodwork, comfortable seating, nice bars. The food in the dining room was quite good -- but remember that P&O is a British Line (though owned by Carnival) so the food will be a bit different than what we're used to. You may have to ask for definitions of what is on the menu. The Indian wait staff is very pleased to be dealing with Americans and will happily make recommendations and explanations. Dining is on an open schedule -- you will be asked if you are "happy to share a table" when you arrive each evening. No formal nights -- my husband needed a pair of long pants to wear to the Tropicana, but not again, even in the ship's dining room. I wore capris throughout the entire trip. A free self-help laundry is available. Laundry detergent can be purchased in the shops. However, it is old only in a bag that holds enough detergent to do a whole lot of loads. If I were to do it again, I would bring a few of the laundry tablets I normally use so avoid having an open bag of laundry detergent in our cabin. We found that we needed more clothes than we had brought because the heat and humidity left us pretty wilted when we returned to the ship. We'd shower and change after a day in port -- so we needed almost twice as many clothes as we expected. This was a cruise that seemed to appeal to those of an age who now move more slowly than we used to. Several people used walkers or scooters and had difficulty on the walking portion of the tours. Cuba's infrastructure is in need of updating. Many areas have cobblestone streets, roads and sidewalks with potholes, making it difficult for those using appliances to get around. In fact, even those of us without the need yet found it difficult to get around. Perhaps in a few years (and after more visitors) things will change. For now, I would strongly suggest that those who are unable to walk without assistance NOT visit Cuba. The sidewalks have many holes and obstructions (light poles in the middle, making the walk too narrow to get a walker by), and no ramps at the corners (just the curbs). The first night aboard, you may fill out your 'affidavit' one more time. Because most of us couldn't remember what we'd done and were certain we'd done it wrong anyway, we simply completed another form and submitted that. As far as I know, nobody ended up in a Cuban jail, so we must have finally gotten it right. Talks are given at prior to each port -- quite informative and enjoyable. The 'Impact' staff are young, enthusiastic, and mostly former Peace Corps volunteers. They fit perfectly with the line's plan for helping people. All of the tours at all stops are led by HavanaTur guides -- a Cuban Government organization. The English spoken is generally good -- some better than others, naturally. The amount of information imparted varies tremendously from guide to guide. All were willing to answer whatever questions we asked -- though sometimes the language difficulties were apparent. We occasionally got answers to the wrong question -- but they all tried to answer as best they could. In Havana, the first tour was a walking tour. A "lots of walking" tour. Lunch was included -- each group seemed to go to a different restaurants. Though I had been told that part of that tour was on a bus -- the entire tour was a walking tour. The heat and humidity were too much for me, but I was able to return to the ship part-way through the tour. In the evening, we went to the Tropicana. While it was an expensive tour, we thoroughly enjoyed it. We drink very little alcohol, so we didn't make as much of the offered beverages as some guests did. When we arrived at the table, we were served a glass of champagne (Cava, actually) with a strawberry floating in it. That was followed by a glass of lemonade -- I'm still not certain if that was plain or alcoholic. Then at our table of 4 we each got a small bottle of Coke with a large bottle of rum (1 liter). Many partial bottles of rum went home on the bus that night. The entertainment was far better than we expected. The show started with violinists and singers. After that, a Vegas-style review -- lots of singing, dancing, and show-girls, with a couple of acrobatic acts. It was an enjoyable evening. It was nearly 1AM when we got back to the ship. The following day was an all-day bus tour (starting around 8 am). Lunch at a restaurant. A visit to a 'cultural center' in the afternoon and a final stop at an arts and craft market before returning to the ship. The stop at the other two ports, Cienfuegos and Santiago de Cuba, followed the same sort of itinerary. All of the restaurants were state owned -- but all provided a good meal, accompanied by musicians. Each of the three stops also provided the opportunity to exchange your American money for CUCs as you got off of the ship (the ship isn't able to exchange for CUCs). The exchange rate varies little -- hovering about 1 to 1 with the American dollar. However, by the time you get through with the additional 10% tax for US dollars, your American dollar was worth about 86 pesos. If you can, change your American money to Euros prior to your US departure (no 10% tax for any other currencies). We found that some American banks will exchange your dollars for Euros at no additional cost. Unfortunately, our bank is not one of those. Bring the cash that you need. At this time, American credit cards are not accepted anywhere, nor can you use your ATM cards. You will spend more on gratuities that you expect. Each day onshore, you will tip your guides (both of them), your driver, the servers at the restaurants, the musicians, the rest room attendants -- worked out to about 30 CUCs per person, per day. You are strongly encouraged NOT to bring items to give away -- no pencils for the kids, no gum, etc. Cuban customs will often tax you for bringing in the items. You will see panhandlers, more in Santiago de Cuba than in other ports, but even in Havana. Again, this is something you are encouraged to ignore. The most persistent woman we saw was one who wanted to give us a CUP, worth about 1/25th of a CUC, as a souvenir. In exchange, she'd like a US $ as a souvenir. And "No" wasn't a word she professed to understand. Shopping: Artwork can be taxed when leaving the port. This caused a bit of consternation when people found they no longer had enough CUCs to pay the tax and had to go back to get the money changed again. It seems to be kind of hit and miss -- who gets taxed and who doesn't. You are each allowed to bring back to the US up to $400 worth of goods. Of that $400, only $100 can be rum and cigars. Cigars are sold in government shops and regardless of what my tourbook said, can be purchased individually. I'd suggest bringing a small box to protect the cigars in your luggage. Since the amount you can bring home will be small, you'll be handed your cigars in a bag unless you're lucky enough to buy the last few in a box. They are not inexpensive and you wouldn't want to crush them on the way home. Musical instruments (maracas, claves, drums) are readily available everywhere, are inexpensive, and fun. Many of the items you'll find in the craft markets are not produced by the seller -- lots are not produced in Cuba. Take care with your souvenirs, unless it happens that you didn't get your desired item when you were in Africa or in Viet Nam. You'll find those items in Cuba. I was very pleased to receive a note while we were sailing, from Fathom, explaining that the port taxes had changed and they were giving us a credit for that amount. That was a 'refundable' credit and could either be used on board, or refunded to our credit card on record. Kudos for the honesty displayed by the line! On the last night, your luggage needs to be outside between 6 and 8 PM. It disappears promptly. You will need to have your printed baggage tags from departure still attached to your luggage. Since ours were pretty beaten up and we had disposed of them, we were glad to have printed extras to fold and use. In the morning, when we disembarked, we were NOT at terminal J, where our car was. A bus was provided to take us to our parking lot. Surprisingly, we didn't have to wait for the bus to fill before we were driven. I don't know if it is customary at Miami that ships go out of one terminal, but return to another. We weren't thrilled to have another leg of moving luggage in our journey, but it worked fairly well with the provided bus. Read Less
Sail Date September 2016
Cuba was simply amazing, although we didn't see as much as we wanted on our tours. The tour guides were also not prepared for us. English wasn't always the best and for the seniors and disabled, there were MANY challenges and the ... Read More
Cuba was simply amazing, although we didn't see as much as we wanted on our tours. The tour guides were also not prepared for us. English wasn't always the best and for the seniors and disabled, there were MANY challenges and the heat was IMMENSE. There should be more emphasis on explaining the major sites and less rushing around. On-board the Fathom Adonia, our wait staff in every restaurant and bar, as well as our cabin stewards were TOP NOTCH. We truly enjoyed these folks, as they made the trip for myself and my friends and family. As for the more administrative staff, especially George Hobin, they could stand additional training. I was disappointed by him, as well as the spa manager, Ina, and the on-board security team. Hopefully, things will improve as they continue their inaugural year and beyond. I believe they need some diversity training as well as some lessons in basic customer service. Overall, it is a decent trip, but the on-board activities and staff need some work. They should also make more provisions for the elderly and disabled so their trip can be made more enjoyable. Read Less
Sail Date September 2016
I wanted to see Cuba before it is flooded with tourist and MacDonalds on every corner. The crew has not been trained and they very unhelpful to the passage's. Their English was very limited if any at all. The two people who made ... Read More
I wanted to see Cuba before it is flooded with tourist and MacDonalds on every corner. The crew has not been trained and they very unhelpful to the passage's. Their English was very limited if any at all. The two people who made the public address announcements could not be understood ( a male & female voices ). The excursions were not very planned. They took the people to typical tourist trap places of businesses. The food on board was terrible. It was the same overcooked food every day of the trip. The Ocean Grill was very good with a decent menu but it was an extra $25.00 per person. Would I used this cruise line again? NO NO The Fantom Cruise line web site is very misleading and the times are all wrong. We departed Miami at dock J and nothing was said about our docking back in Miami. We returned to dock E and were informed of this the night before arriving back into port of Miami. Cars that were parked at the departure dock were a mile away from where we arrived. Had to wait for a shuttle bus to get back to our car. Read Less
Sail Date September 2016
I escorted a group to Cuba on the Adonia. I had been on one of the first sailings to Cuba with Fathom and wanted my friends to experience the beauty of Cuba. I was very curious to see what improvements had been made since the earlier ... Read More
I escorted a group to Cuba on the Adonia. I had been on one of the first sailings to Cuba with Fathom and wanted my friends to experience the beauty of Cuba. I was very curious to see what improvements had been made since the earlier sailings. I was incredibly happy to see that the onboard programs had improved greatly. There was a lot more to do and many more interesting lectures etc had been included into the program. What is still missing in this aspect, is an EXPERT on Cuba. A historian of sorts, to lead these programs on History, Culture etc. But at least they are moving in the right direction in this aspect. The ship itself is amazing. Clean, well apointed, great spaces, and even tho I was on a sold out sailing, it never felt like we were "crowded." Ample space to find a quiet place to relax. Quite frankly, I love what Fathom is trying to do with the Dominican and Cuba programs. I love the idea of giving back, and helping other less fortunate people make their lives a little better. I want this company to succeed!! The one and only caveat to my love for this ship, and it's programs, is the food and beverage service. I'm my opinion. This entire experience is sub par. I've had better food on ships that are MUCH less expensive. The food in the dining room leaves much to be desired. Choices are a not mainstream. Many nights there was no beef or chicken dish to choose from, only rabbit, pork, veal, seafood and an odd vegetarian dish. It seems to me that this F&B staff is used to preparing food for people other than Americans. Two nights on the ship, either could not eat what I ordered and left the dining room hungry (Even after ordering the alternate dish, which is pasta with tomato sauce poured on top of it.) There is absolutely NO Cuban influenced food. There is a wine bar on board. It is a lovely, beautiful space. My favorite room on the ship. But the staff has NO clue what wines need to be served in which wine glasses. I may be knitpicking here a bit. But for discerning clients, who know wine. This is a big deal. When a cruise is charging $4500 + per person as a list price, you can expect clients who know food and wine, and expect a lot more than what is delivered here. Entertainment. There are a few options. The house band is good, but has a relatively limited catalog. When they ask for requests, and then you make requests, but they don't know what you are requesting, what is the point?? The end up playing a lot of the same stuff over and over again each day/night Overall, if you can get this cruise at discounted price. I believe Florida residents get pretty good deals, then it is well worth it, for the Cuban experience alone. However, if you are expecting top notch F & B service, you probably want to skip this cruise until things get better. I should also add, that the ONE reason to choose Fathom over the competition, is that Fathom not only allows you to, but encourages you to go off on your own in Cuba, while other companies stick to the "YOU MUST STAY WITH THE GROUP." idea. Read Less
Sail Date September 2016
We decided to take this cruise because it was an opportunity to see three cities in Cuba before Cuba opens to the USA in a big way and changes. It was advertised as a way to see Cuba, its people, and culture. We went the 10th week that ... Read More
We decided to take this cruise because it was an opportunity to see three cities in Cuba before Cuba opens to the USA in a big way and changes. It was advertised as a way to see Cuba, its people, and culture. We went the 10th week that Fathom has done this cruise. Compared to other cruises we have taken we were sent minimal information on the cruise and itinerary in Cuba, We assumed, incorrectly, that that information would be provided to us when we embarked. There was a Fathom app that we got for the smartphone, but it was not very useful, had the wrong date of the cruise (it was set for the week before) and at least one lecture was put on the wrong time. There were 2 one hour talks on Cuba the night we embargoed but we missed them. The only notice was in a small daily magazine in our cabin called Soundings. We only noticed this magazine the next morning - too late by then.. Embarkation at the port of Miami was relatively smooth except for what we did with our visas and signing a long multiple page form about what we were to do in Cuba. Fortunately, we sat next to a tour guide for Road Scholar who explained it to us. The long form made no difference, but had we not handled the visa correctly it would have been very serious and expensive.. There was no onboard greeting with small drinks as most cruise ships do. No captain's reception - in fact were never saw the captain. The ship is a very modern comfortable ship. It is small enough to be able to get around easily. The décor varies. Some of the lounges and the library are like an English country house with comfortable chairs and fake fireplaces. The wine bar is more modern. The two restaurants are very well appointed. The buffet/cafeteria The Conservatory Buffet) on the upper deck Is more modern and stark. The open air tables and chairs at the back of the Conservatory Buffet are wonderful and open at the back of the ship. The cabins are relatively large for a cruise ship. They have a TV that includes several US channels such as CNN and Fox. There are also 3 channels of movies, but there is no guide to these movies, so you would have to stumble into a movie that you wanted to see by chance. There is a channel that could be used to put the daily schedule in but it is not used - the small river cruise ships in Europe at leas hat a white board with the daily schedule on it - not here. There was a .desk on the 4th floor dealing with shore exclusions, but you had to go done there and ask. The food on the ship is average at best. and does not compare well with other cruise ships we have been on. Only one pastry seemed like it was actually baked on the ship. The choice was limited. There was only one dinner roll offered that was extremely dry. Some of the fruit at breakfast was OK, but others had no taste. The pizza at lunch was good, however. This was true both for the Conservatory Buffet and the Pacific Restaurant (we did not eat in the extra cost Ocean Grill). Fir example, the Pacific Restaurant offered a desert of assorted chees and crackers. However, when we got it it only had one cheese and that seemed processed. On the other hand the breakfast buffet had several cheeses, one of which was very good. We recommend eating in the Conservatory Buffet because there if you get something that Is not good you can try something else. That is unfortunate because the Pacific Restaurant offers the only real chance to socialize. The food was almost institutional. I suspect, but cannot prove, that much of the food was frozen and heated on the ship. There are a lot of bars on board. I don't drink alcohol, but the prices are at the upper end for fine US restaurants. We did not see any drink packages offered, and did not hear of a "happy hour". A soft drink package might have been nice. The service was not exceptional, and certainly not up to the standard of most cruise ships. This may have been because there was a mandatory tip included in the final bill. Interestingly enough, the mandatory tip only included the wait staff, and not the rest of the crew. Access to the internet is a problem. The cheapest service offered was $18.75 for 24 hours. There was no per minute charge or discount for the entire voyage offered. The internet was also slow. Not slow enough not be able to E mail, but noticeably slow. The included shore excursions to Cuba are not good. They relied on Cuban guides from the state owned tourist service. Two of ours spoke good English, but one did not. They used a single microphone and speaker - done of which you could hear on the street. Why don't they use the in-ear devices that the river cruise ships use in Europe - Viking and Grand Circle for example- for shore excursions?. We basically were shown just buildings. We brought a guide book to Cuba with us from the US that was more helpful that the guides. No tours of cigar factories, Hemingway's house in Havana, factories, houses, and the like. Two of the lunches provided on shore were not very good and took up a lot of time. There were a few talks on the ship but these were by Americans. No historians. No Cubans. There must be thousands of Cubans living in Miami who could be on the ship to give us detailed information about Cuba and Cuban life. Essentially, this ship functions as a ferry to Cuba. The main problem with going to Cuba this way is that you spend very little time in Cuba and most of the trip is on the ship. If the ship were a conventional cruise ship with great food, great entertainment, or even extensive lectures on the Cuban people and culture that would be one thing - but the ship is none of this things. Our recommendation is to do what one couple we meet on the ship did. They off got off the ship in Havana and hired one the 1950's US cars for a 4 hours fabulous tour of Havana - the driver knew Havana and took them to the places that they wanted to see. The driver even took them to his father's bakery. they negotiated to about $10 an hour (US) per person but they paid in KUCs. Once you get off the ship you can do whatever you want. Read Less
Sail Date September 2016
WOW! I was a little worried when we booked. One, What would this "impact" cruising be like, and two what would it be like to be on such a small ship. Well, the answer to those questions: AWESOME!!! This is about our 16th cruise. ... Read More
WOW! I was a little worried when we booked. One, What would this "impact" cruising be like, and two what would it be like to be on such a small ship. Well, the answer to those questions: AWESOME!!! This is about our 16th cruise. The Adonia has just been given a facelift and is beautiful. It's like living in a 5 star hotel with a ships pool and 4 TV stations. The service was outstanding. The meals, for the most part, were much better than expected. our cabin was larger and nicely decorated too. (the bathroom was typically small but clean) The tours that were set up were wonderful. We did our own person to person experience on the second day in Havana (which I highly recommend ) We hired a car with an English speaker to take us all over. We insisted that he join us for our meal so we could talk about life in Cuba/USA. That gesture really help break down walls. I think that was our favorite part of our trip. We had so much fun! The people of Cuba are so warm and friendly. I HIGHLY RECOMMEND going!!! BEFORE McDonalds and Starbucks move in!! the Adonia is the ONLY U.S. cruise going to Cuba at this time. Read Less
Sail Date September 2016
The minute we heard on the news that Carnival, Inc. had permission to take Americans to Cuba on a cruise ship, we looked at each other and said, “We have to go before it gets too Americanized.” Learning which ship it would be made it ... Read More
The minute we heard on the news that Carnival, Inc. had permission to take Americans to Cuba on a cruise ship, we looked at each other and said, “We have to go before it gets too Americanized.” Learning which ship it would be made it even better. Shortly after that our friends decided to join us. We booked with Fathom, the new cruise line, directly, picking a mid-September date so they’d have 11 cruises to get their act together before we boarded, and everything went well. It was an absolutely fantabulous trip! Although we’d booked during one of the two weeks most likely for hurricanes, our week slipped in between a tropical storm the week before and Hurricane Matthew two weeks after. Not to be punny, but the cruise couldn’t have been smoother; we felt no wind, waves nor rain the whole week. The ship is familiar; having been the Renaissance R-8, Swan Hellenic Minerva II, Royal Princess, and P & O Adonia, and similar to Princess’ Tahitian/Ocean Princess and Pacific Princess. We’ve been on these ships in the same aft balcony cabin several times; our favorite! The old red and blue carpeting is gone, and it’s been spruced up with new furniture, carpeting, draperies, and is ready for its next adventure to Cuba and the Dominican Republic. We arrived at the dock about 10:30, checked in and had boarded, eaten a buffet lunch and were in our cabins by 12:15 on Sunday. Shortly thereafter we’d unpacked and were exploring. The casino was removed to make a much larger lounge, Anderson’s, on Deck 5 with lots of comfy couches and chairs. Additionally, one of the specialty dining rooms, Sabatini’s, was turned into the lovely Glass House Wine Bar, up on Deck 10. Computers were moved into the Library, which is otherwise untouched. Mike and I opted to eat al fresco on the buffet’s aft deck most meals, while our friends preferred the main dining room. The dress code on the ship is “Casual, but no swim suits in the main dining room at dinner.” We could all live with that. Food was good; not spectacular, but good. There was a Cuban selection each night, as well as some remaining British recipes and of course American fare. When they had rack of lamb we all ate in the Main Dining Room, and two other nights we ate went up to the Sterling Steakhouse. I seriously doubt that a single person onboard lost any weight. By the way, if you're interested in making reservations in the specialty dining room, go up there immediately after boarding and make them. This is no ordinary cruise. There are no glitzy shows; although some of Hemingway’s movies are shown, the thrust of the “entertainment” was to teach us Cuban history, as well as to prepare us for the three ports. There are also no guys trying to push drinks with umbrellas at you whenever you step into a public place. If you want a drink, you have to ask for it. That's refreshing! Tours are included as part of the cruise. Travel is relaxed, but Americans cannot just go wandering off on their own; one must be in a program and with a guide at all times. That’s easy because every licensed taxi driver is also a licensed tour guide (and we have to keep your receipts for 5 years in case the IRS decides to check). After departing Miami on Sunday afternoon, we arrived in Havana at 11 am Monday and were there till about 8 pm on Tuesday. We’d read that the walking tour provided by Fathom on the first day in Havana was through the old city in intense heat with little shade. so we decided to do a “Self-Guided People-to-People” Exchange that day, studied up on where we wanted to go, found a licensed taxi driver/tour guide, and were off to Hemingway’s Havana estate, about 10 miles out of town, and also up to El Morro, the fort at the mouth of the harbor. We’d visited Hemingway’s Key West home on Saturday before boarding, so this would be a Hemingway Literary Tour. After clearing customs we exchanged money. Cuba has two currencies. One is the Cuban Peso (CUP, pronounced coop) that Cubans use; that currency has people on it, and it cannot be converted to other currencies because it is what is paid to workers, who can use it something like food stamps to obtain commodities and clothing at government stores. The other is the Cuban Convertible Peso (CUC, pronounced kook), that has monuments on it, and which is what all tourists use. It is pegged one-for-one to the US dollar; one CUC is equal to 24 CUPs. Got that? There will be a test at the end. Euros and Canadian dollars are exchanged at the going rate, but American dollars are exchanged with a 10% discount. Knowing that, we took Canadian dollars, which we got a super deal on at Wells Fargo. The car was a 1950 green Chevy convertible in cherry condition. We had a blast! Yes, the sun beat down on us at traffic signals; yes, we smelled more exhaust fumes that we had in years, but the wind on our faces with the top down made us all think we were teenagers again. The driver bragged that his car was his grandfather’s, and it was all original. There’s a saying here, “Locked in 1959 with all original parts.” Wish I’d found on a T shirt! At Hemingway’s house the driver got a big jug of water out of the trunk and topped off the radiator. When he finished, Mike said, “Hey, you forgot to replace the cap.” The driver replied, “No es necessario” as he slammed the hood down. By the way, the driver stays with you at each place; he's your guide, even though other people might be on site to answer questions. The house, as all property, was taken over by the government when the Communists set up shop. It was retained as a monument, though, and government employees have been taking care of it since then. While the Key West house had some furniture and several rooms with a pictorial history of the man and his writing, this house showed how Papa lived, simple furnishings with lots of memorabilia from hunting trips all over the world. Both have tons of cats. His bedroom/study, where most of his writing was done, as well as other rooms are open for viewing. There’s a Miro in the dining room, which he most likely got when he lived in Spain, but the home is quite simple. The grounds are lush, the swimming pool inviting, and his boat is in the yard. It’s easy to see why he was depressed when they had to leave for Idaho. After cooling off in the garden a bit, we returned to the car and watched as two men pressed canes through a hand mill to release liquid sugar, which they use to sweeten drinks. Everything here is done in the old fashioned, non-mechanized way, and it’s fascinating to watch. Then we headed back to the old city, past the terminal where the Adonia was docked, drove through a tunnel under the harbor and went up to El Morro. We asked if the tunnel was built by the Russians; the driver said, “No, by the French.” By this time our driver/guide had warmed up to us. We teased him because he honked and waved to all his friends, which seemed to be half of Havana. As we approached a huge statue of Christ that is Cuba’s answer to Rio’s Christ with outstretched arms, he joked that it’s Christ in Jail, explaining that the scaffolding has been in place for years. We didn’t discuss religion, but Castro’s Communism must treat it differently than Russia’s; people in the former Soviet Union countries were not allowed to practice religion and never would have been allowed to build a statue of Christ. Across the way was the house Che Guevara lived in. That house has really been gussied up, at least on the outside, with Che written in bright red on the façade; Che only lived there a few months. El Morro is an imposing fort on a hill overlooking the entry to Havana harbor. It is not as large as the one in San Juan, but apparently in the 1500’s it was big enough to take care of pirates and other enemies of Spain. A secondary part sits on the other side of the water. I assume they could put chains across, if necessary, to prevent boats from entering, and if nothing else cannons could hit them from both sides. In front sits quite an array of Russian planes and other things once used as a defense against any attacks by the US, which we chose not to inspect up close. I need to interject here that the Cuban people are very friendly, energetic, happy that relations with the US are easing and that Americans are once again coming to Cuba. They are eager for the day when we can travel unaccompanied, and when they can legally visit the US. We had purchased tickets online to the Tropicana. After refreshing showers and a quick dinner, we left the terminal, found a Pontiac with AC and once again headed out with a driver/guide. We noted that it had a “5-on-the-post” and the driver explained that many of the older cars have been updated with Toyota 5-speed drive trains; mechanics adapt floor shifts to shift on the post, and they get much better mileage. We arrived early so they sent us to the bar, which overlooks the dining room, and then wished we’d come dinner, as well. The dining room is beautiful. This was our first chance to order a daquori, which was invented in one of a few places in Havana. All drinks at the bar cost 5 CUCs. When we ordered, though, we had no idea that the price of our tickets for the show included a glass of champagne with a strawberry, a vodka Collins, and a 5th of Cuban rum plus cokes (from Mexico) for the four of us. The show was in an air conditioned “grotto”; no smoking and (ahhhh!) air conditioning. Wunnerful! The show was 2 ½ hours long, and we all agreed it was the best any of us had ever seen. The costumes, head dresses, dancing, acrobatics, singing, and tempo were superb. The guys’ only comment was, “Buns of steel.” We returned to the ship after midnight, but the next morning we were on a bus at 7:30 for the city tour. The bus company, like everything else, is government owned; buses are modern, with comfortable seats, air conditioning and clean restrooms with toilet paper. With an expert guide and driver, we covered a lot of territory. We learned that guides are either very pro-Communist or very not, depending on age. One of our guides said, “I’m young; I’m 33, and I want to live in Cuba; I want to keep working here, but I also want to visit the United States. Right now I can’t because I speak English and I can’t get a visa because they are afraid I’ll get to Miami and not leave, but I can’t earn as much money in the US as I can here.” He continued, “The embargo, the Bay of Pigs, they are history; we need to put history behind us. They matter to the old people, but they are not relevant to us young people. We want to be friends with America the way we’re friends with the all other countries in the world.” The guides’ view of Communism also depended upon age. One day our guide was about 60. Or maybe 59 with all original parts. At any rate he told us that everything in Cuba is free, while in the US we had to pay for everything. Here’s what the young guide said. “The old people, they’ll tell you that everything is free. But nothing is free. We pay for everything we get. Everybody works and the first 200 hours a month we work is for the government. (200 hours a month!) Any time we work after that, we get paid. What do we get for our 200 hours per month? We get 16 years of school. We get medical care if we can afford the co-pay. We get a state funeral and burial. We get enough CUPs to buy about 20 lbs of rice, 20 lbs of beans and 20 lbs of pork each month, plus some clothes. We get enough money to share a small apartment with lots of family members. All men must serve in the Army (or Navy); two years if we’ve finished 16 years of school and four years if we’ve finished only 12. Women serve two years if they’ve finished 12 years of school, and none if they finished 16. We have a lot of over-educated people in Cuba.” He also explained that Cubans do not have to be members of the Communist party or swear allegiance to Communism, but membership is required to be part of the National Senate or National Assembly or to be appointed to anything. One more thing; Cuba is definitely a tipping society. Everybody gets a tip, from the tour guide and driver to restaurant hostesses and waiters, to restroom attendants, to people who bring free drinks to those who tell you a bit of history at, say, the Hemingway House to musicians. You get the idea; everybody is tipped for everything. You can tip in CUCs, Euros, Canadian dollars or American dollars; they don’t care, but they expect a tip. The result is that tipping is literally tipping the society. All these service people who receive tips are being tipped in high-value currency. A CUC, remember, is equal to 24 CUPs, which can buy more rice and beans and clothes. What’s happening is that all these people are tipped so much that they earn more than the doctors (who work for the government), and who drive taxis to earn tips after a day of seeing patients. OK. I’ll get off my government spiel and back to our tour. We drove past tons of apartments built by the Russians, just like the ones I called Communist bunkers in the Czech Republic. We also drove by some of the homes that were once privately owned and taken over by the government, many now turned into guest houses. At the National Hotel, our guide said it was formerly the Mafia headquarters, but now they only have one Mafia: Castro. We stopped at the Casa de Fuster, or Fusterlandia as they call the home of artist-sculptor Jose Fuster. It is reminiscent of Gaudi’s Parq Guell in Barcelona or the Young Adults section of the Camarillo Library. All I can say is, “WOW!” This man thought that his neighborhood needed to be inspired, to have something to make them happy when there was very little to be happy about. So he began to tile everything at his home with whimsy; there are cacti, giraffes, cowboys, and all kinds of things piled one on top of the other and on every wall. Neighbors got into the act and helped; even the street markers in that area are tiled. It’s not in my guidebooks, but if you get to Havana, be sure to see the Fuster House. Next up was the Cemetario de Colon. Although Columbus landed on Cuba, he did not die here and was buried in Genoa, Italy. However, the cemetery bears his name. It has some fantastic monuments that were built by very rich people before Castro took over; they remain. However, the cemetery is pretty much full so, and here’s the zinger, after the state funeral that everybody gets, the bodies are buried in available plots, but they can only stay there for two years, when they are dug up and given to the family so that other people can be buried in the plot. Lunch was at La Floridita, a place claiming to have invented the daquori, and definitely a Havana Hemingway Hangout. Then it was time for shopping, or “chopping” as the guides all called it. Our friends were dropped off at the ship; we bought a few things and returned to the bus to talk in depth with the young, forthright guide. Wish we could have spent more time in and out of Havana, but it was time to leave for Cienfuegos, where we’d arrive after a day at sea. Cienfuegos, a hundred fires, was named for Senor Cienfuegos and has nothing to do with fires. It is a resort city for Canadians, Europeans and Cubans who can afford it. We stopped at a folk park where residents had made a lot of interesting things from metal, and drove by old mansions-now-guest houses, plus the yacht club. We had checked before leaving, and Cienfuegos was the home of Dodgers right fielderr, Yaseil Puig. The cruise line warned us not to take gifts to distribute because it would create problems for those who come later by setting the expectation of gifts. We bought a Dodger baseball cap at Big 5 and were discrete, although we became doubtful when our (older, “59 and holding”) guide told us what a traitor Puig was for defecting to the US as we drove by the city baseball stadium. As we disembarked the bus to walk around the Plaza de Armas, Mike donned the cap. We tried to detour an old Chevy convertible. but the driver turned to sell us a tour—and then spotted Mike’s cap. He immediately said, “How much for your hat?” Mike hesitated; the guy almost panicked. “How much? How much for the hat?” Finally, Mike asked, “Do you have a son?” The guy smiled, “Yes; he’s 11,” he responded. “Does he like Puig?” “Yes, he loves Puig.” So Mike removed the cap, bowed, and said, “This cap is for your son.” Believe me, that man and his wife would have done anything for us, but we only wanted pictures of him and his car—and we didn’t give him a tip, either. After seeing some very nicely restored buildings on the plaza we entered the Teatro Tomas Terry, a theater donated to the city by a rich resident, for a choral presentation, which was fantastic! Later we walked through a street market, saw several delivery wagons pulled by mules, had a local beer (Cristal) to cool off, and then it was time to return to the ship and depart for Santiago de Cuba. Santiago de Cuba is the “birthplace of Cuban Revolution,” and not just Castro’s revolution. It’s also home to San Juan Hill. Our first stop was at the Plaza de Armas, which is filled with huge bulletin boards that are filled with more information than we wanted to read about the history of Castro and Che’s first attempt to take over Bautista’s government here in Santiago de Cuba, in both Spanish and English. We quickly followed our guide down a street to a little bar; each bus went to a different bar (there were 15 buses), where we heard typical Cuban music and dancing (Rhumba and Samba—no Conga line, though). The bar was actually an open patio, enclosed on four sides, and pretty hot, even in the shade. However, seeing the musicians and dancers was more important than being on the shady side or sunny side. There were guitars, a very unusual base, a flute, singers and two dancers, and the 45 minute performance wasn’t nearly long enough. It was the kind of stuff that could keep us sitting all night, enjoying the music. We really wish we could have stayed twice as long! The time had come to walk back to the bus on the Plaza, with enough time for more “chopping”. In addition to the Dodgers cap, we’d taken a Mickey Mouse cap, which I kept in my purse. At a hat and guitar shop we spotted a toddler with her two abuelas and father, the shopkeeper. While he tried to sell another hat to Mike, I bent over and asked the little girl, “Conoces Mickey Mouse?” She looked at me and grabbed the cap from my hand. Her grandmas said in unison, “Si, conoce Mickey Mouse” as one of them put it on her head. She pulled it off and refused to put it on again. Then she began to run all over, stopping only to look at Mickey. We later heard what happens when you bring gifts and just hand them out. We had not seen any beggars in Havana, but there were some in Santiago de Cuba. One woman from the ship had a large bag of T shirts she’d brought, and handed one to a beggar. Another immediately showed up, and she gave him one, too. Then another and another and she was finally overwhelmed by beggars fighting over her T shirts. Another cruiser ran to the police, who broke up the fight and hauled the beggars off. After lunch at an open-air restaurant above the owner’s home, we went to San Juan Hill, where they talked about the Spanish Cuban American War, asking why the Spanish and Americans never mention Cuba in the name of the war in which they won their independence from Spain. With no mention of Teddy Roosevelt nor the Rough Riders, we saw all kinds of monuments to Cuban and American heroes. I noted the 31st militia from Michigan and another from Ohio; all the names are listed on each monument. All of us learned a lot of Cuban history, including the fact that the US had temporary control of Cuba after that 1898 war. Our final stop was at the Forteleza, above the harbor. We climbed and snapped pictures, but it was hot and we were tired. This fort, like the one in Havana, is not as large as El Morro in San Juan, but it got the job done and protected the harbor from invaders for Spain for centuries. Then it was time to return to the ship and say adios to Cuba. It seemed as if we’d only been gone 4 or 5 days, but after a day at sea, we were back in Miami with only our memories Read Less
Sail Date September 2016
We chose this cruise because my husband wanted to see Havana before it became Miami. The only way I was going to a Cuba was on a ship with 5 star amenities. I thought Cuban hotels would be marginal and I was not wrong. Also since this ... Read More
We chose this cruise because my husband wanted to see Havana before it became Miami. The only way I was going to a Cuba was on a ship with 5 star amenities. I thought Cuban hotels would be marginal and I was not wrong. Also since this was a delayed honeymoon this had to be a special trip for romance and learning. I was not disappointed. We sailed in September after the Fathom organization worked out details on this unparalleled experience. I appreciated the British tone to the hospitality. The ship was recently refreshed and offered a combination of traditional elegance and current fresh design trends. The small ship experience was divine. The lectures about Cuba were insightful. The pace was good. After two days in hot stimulating Havana a day at sea was needed. We met wonderful people who were seasoned travelers and it was enriching to share our experiences. We traveled on very comfortable Chinese air conditioned busses. That was essential since the heat was intense. 108 degrees in Santiago. I am glad for the breezy maxi dresses and large hats. The Destination of Cuba was glorious. I was braced for the poverty-stricken but encouraged by the positive spirit of those we met. Cubans were glad to see us and we enjoyed their shared talent of music and dance. This was a cultural exchange that met the approval of the Cuban government. On the return we have been asked about the food. The ship was fine. For breakfast I feasted on the croissants and fresh fruit. Dinner was always interesting. I was not this cruise to gain weight and I did not. What made dinner wonderful was the great service and meeting new people for stimulating conversations.The food in Cuba was OK in three different venues.I was here for the cultural experience not the cuisine. Cubans do not have access to a wide range of spices so the tastes were limited. I sensed they were offering their best effort. I will spare you details..but do not drink anything in a bottle you have not opened. I learned that early. The ship has great bar tenders! The English Garden Martini was sensational! For so many reasons this trip will be hard to top! Read Less
Sail Date September 2016

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