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Uniworld 12 Day Splendors of Egypt and the Nile plus two extra days As an introduction, I am a recently retired, intellectually inquisitive, mid 60’s female traveling alone. I arrived in Cairo at December 7 two days pre tour. Some things I learned: 1) Egyptian prices are great. Everything was inexpensive in comparison to USA prices. Haggling is expected. 2) The protest are over and the Egyptians want tourists to come. I felt very safe everywhere I traveled. 3) The two days before were great. If it hadn’t been Dec 20 I would have liked to stay an additional day. 4) At many sites no photography allowed, but if you pay the guide some photos can be taken (Pyramids, Abu Simbel). Of course many people will smile and motion for you to take their photo or that they will ask to take your photo, but they all want a tip for the pleasure. 5) On the river cruise portion; 2 additional couples joined our Uniworld group with their own guides for 3 nights in Luxor. I had looked at this option through other tour operators (Kensington for example), but as a solo traveler, I wanted to travel with others so joining the Uniworld package tour was better for me personally, but if I was with a traveling companion I might consider this option. 6) The M/V Tosca was great. The crew very nice, the food very good and the cabins very nice. 7) The best thing I did was to download articles about Egypt from National Geographic and Wikipedia to my iPad. There is downtime at airports, flights, bus rides, and when the SAT TV on the boat is not working to read the articles to reinforce and add additional depth to what you are seeing. It made the experience so much better. 8) This was the best trip I have ever taken and I have traveled to 80 countries. Friday December 8-On my own I arranged for Uniworld to drop me off at the Egyptian museum. I paid to see the museum, the Royal mummies, and camera use ($20). A guide quickly approached me and I engaged him for one hour at the cost of about $11 dollars. I learned a lot and then explored the museum for two additional hours. I met our tour's Egyptologist Assem and the van at 1PM and we drove to the old walled Islamic city and walked down a lovely old street with classic period of beautiful Islamic architecture of mosques and cistern/schools. We walked through the bazar past the al-Hussein Mosque and back out (cost $80). I also have to commend the Egyptologist Assem who accompanied Uniworld through the entire tour; he was such a pleasure to have on our journey. He was very smart, competent and passionate about Egypt and Egyptian history. He was an excellent and patient teacher throughout this journey. Saturday December 9-Old Cairo and Souk I arranged to join in with 4 other passengers to do “The Coptic Tour” with a van and Assem. We saw the Hanging Coptic church built on pillars, and a Coptic museum, a Greek Orthodox Church, The Saints Sergius and Bacchus Church that was built over a cave purported to have housed the holy family during their Egyptian exile. We also saw an old synagogue. This was followed by a trip back to the Bazar and a walk to the far side to the tentmaker’s street (cost $60 pp.). Sunday Dec. 10-Cairo Museum and Citadel On the first official day of the12-day tour we met with our group of 25 Americans, consisting mostly of couples 40-70 in age, a family group of four, a couple traveling with friend, and two solo ladies (myself included). This day we went to the Egyptian Museum and had a tour provided by Assem, ( I am glad I had spent 3 hours already). Then we walked over to the Ritz Carleton for lunch, and then boarded the bus for a drive across town to the Saladin Citadel and the Alabaster Mosque. Monday Dec. 11- Flight to Luxor and Temple of Karnak We had a 3 AM wakeup and a 4:30 pickup to head to the Cairo airport to catch the small plane for the 1-hour flight to Luxor. Upon landing we immediately boarded a bus and drove into Luxor for a visit to the Karnak Temple, a 250-acre complex dedicated to the god Amun. The impressive Temple Hall with 134 columns is the world’s largest columnar structure. After the tour we headed to join the M/S Tosca at dock on the east bank of the Nile. We had a brief orientation around 10:30 AM and then were guided to our cabins, followed by lunch. The remainder of the afternoon was free. I had hoped to walk into town, but the ship is docked in a remote area. Luckily the Tosca always has the outside berth (with three empty ships and one other active cruise ship). I had booked an odd number cabin, but was thankfully moved to an even number cabin, which always has the river view. Tuesday. December 12. Temple of Hathor and Temple of Luxor We took our bus to the temple of the cow goddess Hathor in Dendara (south of Qena) on the west bank of the Nile. It is the most complete Greco-Roman temple complex and dates from 100 BCE, although built on much older foundations. There we beautiful painted walls and ceilings with very strong carvings. The Christians later defaced the temple in 300 AD, but not everywhere (above easy reach) and the colors were very beautiful. Returned to the ship for lunch then we went to the Luxor Temple for sunset (3-6 PM), which was so lovely light up at night. After dinner, we had a belly dancer and whirling dervish show. Wednesday December 13. Valley of the Kings The seventeen passengers who opted for the additional $120 hot air balloon excursion left at 4:45 am, boarded a van then a ferry across the Nile, and then a van to the hot air balloons. The balloon held 33 passengers in 8 compartments plus one with the operator. After we lifted off the ride was amazing. Sailing over the valleys of the Nobel’s, the Queens and the workers, but NOT the Valley of the Kings. It gave me a great perspective of the valley and the neighboring valleys. There were 100’s of tombs everywhere. We were airborne for about an hour then landed. It was very interesting to see the crew compress the balloon and contain it, took about 10 men. After we landed, fought off the vendors, and tipped everyone, we took a van to meet up with the bus and the 8 others at the Colossi of Memnon, or more correctly the two massive stone statues of the Pharaoh Amenhotep III and drove to the Valley of the Kings. At the Valley of the Kings you have to buy an extra camera ticket ($11), and you are checked rigorously in all the tombs. We saw three tombs. KV 2 (Ramses IV), KV 11 (Ramses III), and KV 14 the tomb built by the Queen Tausert and later taken over by her son Setnakht. The tombs walls were covered with beautiful carvings and colorful paintings. The Valley of the Kings was hot and dusty, but it was amazing; the fulfillment of a lifelong dream. Afterwards we went to an alabaster factory/ bathroom stop, prices were very high. We then headed to Deir-el-Bahri and the Mortuary Temple of Hatshepsut, which was amazing. It was approaching 2 pm and we went back to the ship, the drive in the bus was much longer than our early morning the ferry ride across the Nile. There are not a lot of bridges across the Nile. We set sail for Esna locks and arrived in the dark. That night was Egypt dinner and Galabiya party where the crew entertains with dances and music. Very fun. Thursday, December 14, Kom Ombo and Aswan We started the morning at the Kom Ombo temple (gold mountain). This was an important trading center from the east. The Greco-Roman temple (200 BCE- 300 AD) was laid out as two parallel temples. One was dedicated to Sobek the evil crocodile God of the Nile, and the other to the good falcon god Horus. Afterwards there was some shopping time, as we were the only ship docked. The vendors are very aggressive, but they are only trying to live, and tourists are not common. We then set sail to Aswan and had a lecture on Egyptian history and life in modern Egypt by our Egyptologist Assem. The Nile is much larger than I expected somewhere between the Mississippi and the Ohio in size. In Luxor, the strip of green along the Nile was a mile wide, but as we approached Aswan, the green strip was only a few trees. We had a lovely lunch on the upper deck during the sail from Kom Ombo to Aswan. About 3 pm we arrived in Aswan and walked to a nearby felucca for an hour-long cruise around Elephantine Island. The weather was perfect, sunny but not hot. We were serenaded by young boys on surfboards (frère Jacque and the Macarena to name a few tunes). The Nubian crew sold camel bone trinkets (no-one ever passed up an opportunity to try and sell us something!) The Nubian crew was very skilled in docking the felucca, with only sail power to tack against the wind. We then boarded the bus for a short ride to the Old Cataract Hotel, where we were told Agatha Christie spent 6 months writing Death on the Nile (she did stay here, but not that long). We had high tea and watched the sunset. It was lovely. The first Cataract on Nile marks the barrier for Nile navigation. Friday December 15- Aswan This morning we left early and it was nice and cool. We headed to see the nearby granite quarry to see the unfinished obelisk, which cracked and was then abandoned. Then we headed to see the old 1902 British dam and the new 1964 Aswan dam. After that we visited the Greco Roman Philae temple on an island. This is one of the 13 temples moved because of the building of the Aswan dam. You can see the small mostly submerged nearby Island where the temple originally stood. Here there were many vendors (on boat we took to get to the temple and on shore). There was also a stop at the requisite overpriced Aswan Elite perfume store. At 3PM we walked to a small motorboat for a trip to the first cataracts of the Nile. In the past this area would have been a waterfall, but since the building of the dam there are 100s of small-protected islands that have become bird and wildlife sanctuaries. A local guide pointed out the wildlife. Then we went to a Nubian village and visited a home where we learned about how the Nubians were moved to villages when the dam was built. The Nubians are from the south and traditionally darker than the northern Egyptians. The general view is that they are much happier in the new villages with electricity and education. The owner of the house made woven scarves. His handmade scarves were beautiful, inexpensive and a cut above the regular scarves that were found everywhere. I wish I had bought more because his scarves were a unique souvenir. After wards we walked through the village. I had brought small items, Halloween M&M’s, toothbrushes and combs from amenities kits, pens and lanyard chains and freebies that I picked up at professional meetings. I started to pass these out to the children. They were so excitedly grabbing the items and asking for more, they especially wanted the combs. I barely escaped, but I hope they liked them. Saturday December 16- Abu Simbel Today the entire group too the optional tour to Abu Simbel ($295). We took the 10 am flight to Abu Simbel the magnificent rock carved temple that marked the Egyptian southern border with the Nubians. The Aswan airport has extensive security because if the dam were bombed millions of Egyptians would be killed. After a very short flight we arrived at Abu Simbel and the entire plane took a shuttle bus to the Temple and toured for about an hour then got back on the bus, returned to the airport went through various security checks and took the same waiting plane back to Aswan. Very civilized. The Abu Simble consist of four 20 m statues (one missing) of Ramses II and is one of the most beautiful temples in Egypt. Next to it is the temple to his favorite wife Nefertari. Because of thewater behind the Aswan Dam, the temples were carved into 30-ton blocks and reassembled 200 ft. away. I remember this from my childhood and it was a site worth seeing. We were back on the ship by 2 PM and set sail for the Esna locks. It was a lovely afternoon sailing on the Nile. The weather was perfect. Sunday December 17- Esna temple and town We arrived at Esna at 9 am and walked a short distances through the street to see the Esna Temple. The Greco-Roman temple was dedicated to Khnum the creator god who fashioned humans on a pottery wheel. We also visited an ancient oil press and a Coptic church. We left and sailed through the Esna locks and then on to Luxor enjoying the scenery and the final sunset on the Nile. It was a wonderful cruise. That night 16 passengers went to the advertised Luxor Sound and Light show ($38), which was actually held at Karnak Temple. Not sure if I would have gone if I had known it was actually at Karnak, because I had not seen the Karnak Temple at night and would have liked to. However, I chose not to go to the Luxor because I had read that the Luxor S&L show was not worth it, but the ones who went to this excursion did not appear to like the Karnak version any better. However I would have liked to see the spectacular Karnak Temple at night. Monday December 18, return to Cairo and Sound and Light Show This was a leisurely morning. We had to have the luggage out by 9AM, and the bus at 9:45 for the noon flight back to Cairo. The crew gave us a lovely send off, and we knew that the next load of 19 passengers would board for their week-long cruise (as we did seven days before) in several hours. We were in the Four Seasons at 3:30 PM. I ordered room service and several of us left for the Sound and Light Show at the pyramids at 5 PM. Many who had done the Light show at Karnak the night before opted out, but I wanted to see the pyramids, and even in the dusk/dark they were amazing. The show was OK, but it was difficult to follow, as some of the mish mash of historical events they discussed were not even related to Giza. Overall I was happy I went and it was included. Tuesday December 19, Last Day. -Memphis, Saqqara and Giza We left the hotel at 7:15 AM and drove about 40 minutes (20 miles) to the ancient Old Kingdom capital Memphis. This is a huge and ancient (3000 BCE) archeological site, but a very small tourist site. We saw the alabaster sphinx, and the fallen statue of Ramses II. Then we headed to the nearby necropolis called Saqqara. There are numerous tombs and mastabas in this area several pyramids including the famous step pyramid of Djoser (~2600 BCE). There was an interesting museum and we learned about Imhotep the architect of Djoser’s pyramid. After this we went to an expensive carpet factory/toilet break and the drove about 10 miles to Giza. We had a photo stop at Khufu (~2500 BCE) pyramid, and could walk up to the entry, but we did not go in. Then we drove to Menkaura’s pyramid (~2500 BCE) where we could go inside. Again they said no pictures (so I left my camera), but the guard inside allowed photos for a tip. After this we all went for a camel ride ($11) and gave a $6 tip. It was very touristy but memorable. This was followed up with the Sphinx up close and lastly a stop at a very expensive “Cotton shop”. We were back to the hotel at 4:30, where some folks were leaving for the airport in 6 hours! I woke at 2:30 for the 3:30 bus to airport, where we went through three security checks and sat around for an hour for the Lufthansa desk to open, and 21 hours later I was home. I have the most wonderful memories

Wonderful Egypt

River Tosca Cruise Review by Leo_On_Geo

22 people found this helpful
Trip Details
Uniworld 12 Day Splendors of Egypt and the Nile plus two extra days

As an introduction, I am a recently retired, intellectually inquisitive, mid 60’s female traveling alone. I arrived in Cairo at December 7 two days pre tour.

Some things I learned:

1) Egyptian prices are great. Everything was inexpensive in comparison to USA prices. Haggling is expected.

2) The protest are over and the Egyptians want tourists to come. I felt very safe everywhere I traveled.

3) The two days before were great. If it hadn’t been Dec 20 I would have liked to stay an additional day.

4) At many sites no photography allowed, but if you pay the guide some photos can be taken (Pyramids, Abu Simbel). Of course many people will smile and motion for you to take their photo or that they will ask to take your photo, but they all want a tip for the pleasure.

5) On the river cruise portion; 2 additional couples joined our Uniworld group with their own guides for 3 nights in Luxor. I had looked at this option through other tour operators (Kensington for example), but as a solo traveler, I wanted to travel with others so joining the Uniworld package tour was better for me personally, but if I was with a traveling companion I might consider this option.

6) The M/V Tosca was great. The crew very nice, the food very good and the cabins very nice.

7) The best thing I did was to download articles about Egypt from National Geographic and Wikipedia to my iPad. There is downtime at airports, flights, bus rides, and when the SAT TV on the boat is not working to read the articles to reinforce and add additional depth to what you are seeing. It made the experience so much better.

8) This was the best trip I have ever taken and I have traveled to 80 countries.

Friday December 8-On my own

I arranged for Uniworld to drop me off at the Egyptian museum. I paid to see the museum, the Royal mummies, and camera use ($20). A guide quickly approached me and I engaged him for one hour at the cost of about $11 dollars. I learned a lot and then explored the museum for two additional hours. I met our tour's Egyptologist Assem and the van at 1PM and we drove to the old walled Islamic city and walked down a lovely old street with classic period of beautiful Islamic architecture of mosques and cistern/schools. We walked through the bazar past the al-Hussein Mosque and back out (cost $80). I also have to commend the Egyptologist Assem who accompanied Uniworld through the entire tour; he was such a pleasure to have on our journey. He was very smart, competent and passionate about Egypt and Egyptian history. He was an excellent and patient teacher throughout this journey.

Saturday December 9-Old Cairo and Souk

I arranged to join in with 4 other passengers to do “The Coptic Tour” with a van and Assem. We saw the Hanging Coptic church built on pillars, and a Coptic museum, a Greek Orthodox Church, The Saints Sergius and Bacchus Church that was built over a cave purported to have housed the holy family during their Egyptian exile. We also saw an old synagogue. This was followed by a trip back to the Bazar and a walk to the far side to the tentmaker’s street (cost $60 pp.).

Sunday Dec. 10-Cairo Museum and Citadel

On the first official day of the12-day tour we met with our group of 25 Americans, consisting mostly of couples 40-70 in age, a family group of four, a couple traveling with friend, and two solo ladies (myself included). This day we went to the Egyptian Museum and had a tour provided by Assem, ( I am glad I had spent 3 hours already). Then we walked over to the Ritz Carleton for lunch, and then boarded the bus for a drive across town to the Saladin Citadel and the Alabaster Mosque.

Monday Dec. 11- Flight to Luxor and Temple of Karnak

We had a 3 AM wakeup and a 4:30 pickup to head to the Cairo airport to catch the small plane for the 1-hour flight to Luxor. Upon landing we immediately boarded a bus and drove into Luxor for a visit to the Karnak Temple, a 250-acre complex dedicated to the god Amun. The impressive Temple Hall with 134 columns is the world’s largest columnar structure. After the tour we headed to join the M/S Tosca at dock on the east bank of the Nile. We had a brief orientation around 10:30 AM and then were guided to our cabins, followed by lunch. The remainder of the afternoon was free. I had hoped to walk into town, but the ship is docked in a remote area. Luckily the Tosca always has the outside berth (with three empty ships and one other active cruise ship). I had booked an odd number cabin, but was thankfully moved to an even number cabin, which always has the river view.

Tuesday. December 12. Temple of Hathor and Temple of Luxor

We took our bus to the temple of the cow goddess Hathor in Dendara (south of Qena) on the west bank of the Nile. It is the most complete Greco-Roman temple complex and dates from 100 BCE, although built on much older foundations. There we beautiful painted walls and ceilings with very strong carvings. The Christians later defaced the temple in 300 AD, but not everywhere (above easy reach) and the colors were very beautiful. Returned to the ship for lunch then we went to the Luxor Temple for sunset (3-6 PM), which was so lovely light up at night. After dinner, we had a belly dancer and whirling dervish show.

Wednesday December 13. Valley of the Kings

The seventeen passengers who opted for the additional $120 hot air balloon excursion left at 4:45 am, boarded a van then a ferry across the Nile, and then a van to the hot air balloons. The balloon held 33 passengers in 8 compartments plus one with the operator. After we lifted off the ride was amazing. Sailing over the valleys of the Nobel’s, the Queens and the workers, but NOT the Valley of the Kings. It gave me a great perspective of the valley and the neighboring valleys. There were 100’s of tombs everywhere. We were airborne for about an hour then landed. It was very interesting to see the crew compress the balloon and contain it, took about 10 men.

After we landed, fought off the vendors, and tipped everyone, we took a van to meet up with the bus and the 8 others at the Colossi of Memnon, or more correctly the two massive stone statues of the Pharaoh Amenhotep III and drove to the Valley of the Kings. At the Valley of the Kings you have to buy an extra camera ticket ($11), and you are checked rigorously in all the tombs. We saw three tombs. KV 2 (Ramses IV), KV 11 (Ramses III), and KV 14 the tomb built by the Queen Tausert and later taken over by her son Setnakht. The tombs walls were covered with beautiful carvings and colorful paintings. The Valley of the Kings was hot and dusty, but it was amazing; the fulfillment of a lifelong dream. Afterwards we went to an alabaster factory/ bathroom stop, prices were very high. We then headed to Deir-el-Bahri and the Mortuary Temple of Hatshepsut, which was amazing. It was approaching 2 pm and we went back to the ship, the drive in the bus was much longer than our early morning the ferry ride across the Nile. There are not a lot of bridges across the Nile. We set sail for Esna locks and arrived in the dark. That night was Egypt dinner and Galabiya party where the crew entertains with dances and music. Very fun.

Thursday, December 14, Kom Ombo and Aswan

We started the morning at the Kom Ombo temple (gold mountain). This was an important trading center from the east. The Greco-Roman temple (200 BCE- 300 AD) was laid out as two parallel temples. One was dedicated to Sobek the evil crocodile God of the Nile, and the other to the good falcon god Horus. Afterwards there was some shopping time, as we were the only ship docked. The vendors are very aggressive, but they are only trying to live, and tourists are not common. We then set sail to Aswan and had a lecture on Egyptian history and life in modern Egypt by our Egyptologist Assem. The Nile is much larger than I expected somewhere between the Mississippi and the Ohio in size. In Luxor, the strip of green along the Nile was a mile wide, but as we approached Aswan, the green strip was only a few trees.

We had a lovely lunch on the upper deck during the sail from Kom Ombo to Aswan. About 3 pm we arrived in Aswan and walked to a nearby felucca for an hour-long cruise around Elephantine Island. The weather was perfect, sunny but not hot. We were serenaded by young boys on surfboards (frère Jacque and the Macarena to name a few tunes). The Nubian crew sold camel bone trinkets (no-one ever passed up an opportunity to try and sell us something!) The Nubian crew was very skilled in docking the felucca, with only sail power to tack against the wind. We then boarded the bus for a short ride to the Old Cataract Hotel, where we were told Agatha Christie spent 6 months writing Death on the Nile (she did stay here, but not that long). We had high tea and watched the sunset. It was lovely. The first Cataract on Nile marks the barrier for Nile navigation.

Friday December 15- Aswan

This morning we left early and it was nice and cool. We headed to see the nearby granite quarry to see the unfinished obelisk, which cracked and was then abandoned. Then we headed to see the old 1902 British dam and the new 1964 Aswan dam. After that we visited the Greco Roman Philae temple on an island. This is one of the 13 temples moved because of the building of the Aswan dam. You can see the small mostly submerged nearby Island where the temple originally stood. Here there were many vendors (on boat we took to get to the temple and on shore). There was also a stop at the requisite overpriced Aswan Elite perfume store.

At 3PM we walked to a small motorboat for a trip to the first cataracts of the Nile. In the past this area would have been a waterfall, but since the building of the dam there are 100s of small-protected islands that have become bird and wildlife sanctuaries. A local guide pointed out the wildlife. Then we went to a Nubian village and visited a home where we learned about how the Nubians were moved to villages when the dam was built. The Nubians are from the south and traditionally darker than the northern Egyptians. The general view is that they are much happier in the new villages with electricity and education. The owner of the house made woven scarves. His handmade scarves were beautiful, inexpensive and a cut above the regular scarves that were found everywhere. I wish I had bought more because his scarves were a unique souvenir. After wards we walked through the village. I had brought small items, Halloween M&M’s, toothbrushes and combs from amenities kits, pens and lanyard chains and freebies that I picked up at professional meetings. I started to pass these out to the children. They were so excitedly grabbing the items and asking for more, they especially wanted the combs. I barely escaped, but I hope they liked them.

Saturday December 16- Abu Simbel

Today the entire group too the optional tour to Abu Simbel ($295). We took the 10 am flight to Abu Simbel the magnificent rock carved temple that marked the Egyptian southern border with the Nubians. The Aswan airport has extensive security because if the dam were bombed millions of Egyptians would be killed. After a very short flight we arrived at Abu Simbel and the entire plane took a shuttle bus to the Temple and toured for about an hour then got back on the bus, returned to the airport went through various security checks and took the same waiting plane back to Aswan. Very civilized. The Abu Simble consist of four 20 m statues (one missing) of Ramses II and is one of the most beautiful temples in Egypt. Next to it is the temple to his favorite wife Nefertari. Because of thewater behind the Aswan Dam, the temples were carved into 30-ton blocks and reassembled 200 ft. away. I remember this from my childhood and it was a site worth seeing. We were back on the ship by 2 PM and set sail for the Esna locks. It was a lovely afternoon sailing on the Nile. The weather was perfect.

Sunday December 17- Esna temple and town

We arrived at Esna at 9 am and walked a short distances through the street to see the Esna Temple. The Greco-Roman temple was dedicated to Khnum the creator god who fashioned humans on a pottery wheel. We also visited an ancient oil press and a Coptic church. We left and sailed through the Esna locks and then on to Luxor enjoying the scenery and the final sunset on the Nile. It was a wonderful cruise. That night 16 passengers went to the advertised Luxor Sound and Light show ($38), which was actually held at Karnak Temple. Not sure if I would have gone if I had known it was actually at Karnak, because I had not seen the Karnak Temple at night and would have liked to. However, I chose not to go to the Luxor because I had read that the Luxor S&L show was not worth it, but the ones who went to this excursion did not appear to like the Karnak version any better. However I would have liked to see the spectacular Karnak Temple at night.

Monday December 18, return to Cairo and Sound and Light Show

This was a leisurely morning. We had to have the luggage out by 9AM, and the bus at 9:45 for the noon flight back to Cairo. The crew gave us a lovely send off, and we knew that the next load of 19 passengers would board for their week-long cruise (as we did seven days before) in several hours. We were in the Four Seasons at 3:30 PM. I ordered room service and several of us left for the Sound and Light Show at the pyramids at 5 PM. Many who had done the Light show at Karnak the night before opted out, but I wanted to see the pyramids, and even in the dusk/dark they were amazing. The show was OK, but it was difficult to follow, as some of the mish mash of historical events they discussed were not even related to Giza. Overall I was happy I went and it was included.

Tuesday December 19, Last Day. -Memphis, Saqqara and Giza

We left the hotel at 7:15 AM and drove about 40 minutes (20 miles) to the ancient Old Kingdom capital Memphis. This is a huge and ancient (3000 BCE) archeological site, but a very small tourist site. We saw the alabaster sphinx, and the fallen statue of Ramses II. Then we headed to the nearby necropolis called Saqqara. There are numerous tombs and mastabas in this area several pyramids including the famous step pyramid of Djoser (~2600 BCE). There was an interesting museum and we learned about Imhotep the architect of Djoser’s pyramid.

After this we went to an expensive carpet factory/toilet break and the drove about 10 miles to Giza. We had a photo stop at Khufu (~2500 BCE) pyramid, and could walk up to the entry, but we did not go in. Then we drove to Menkaura’s pyramid (~2500 BCE) where we could go inside. Again they said no pictures (so I left my camera), but the guard inside allowed photos for a tip. After this we all went for a camel ride ($11) and gave a $6 tip. It was very touristy but memorable. This was followed up with the Sphinx up close and lastly a stop at a very expensive “Cotton shop”. We were back to the hotel at 4:30, where some folks were leaving for the airport in 6 hours!

I woke at 2:30 for the 3:30 bus to airport, where we went through three security checks and sat around for an hour for the Lufthansa desk to open, and 21 hours later I was home. I have the most wonderful memories
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Cabin 206
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Port & Shore Excursion Reviews

  • City Tour
    I arranged for Uniworld to drop me off at the Egyptian museum. I paid to see the museum, the Royal mummies, and camera use ($20). A guide quickly approached me and I engaged him for one hour at the cost of about $11 dollars. I learned a lot and then explored the museum for two additional hours. I met the tour Egyptologist Assem and the van at 1PM and we drove to the old walled Islamic city and walked down a lovely old street with classic period of beautiful Islamic architecture of mosques and cistern/schools. We walked through the bazar past the al-Hussein Mosque and back out (cost $80). I also have to commend the Egyptologist Assem who accompanied Uniworld through the entire tour; he was such a pleasure to have on our journey. He was very smart, competent and passionate about Egypt and Egyptian history. He was an excellent and patient teacher throughout this journey.

    Saturday December 9-Old Cairo and Souk
    I arranged to join in with 4 other passengers to do “The Coptic Tour” with a van and Assem. We saw the Hanging Coptic church built on pillars, and a Coptic museum, a Greek Orthodox Church, The Saints Sergius and Bacchus Church that was built over a cave purported to have housed the holy family during their Egyptian exile. We also saw an old synagogue. This was followed by a trip back to the Bazar and a walk to the far side to the tentmaker’s street (cost $60 pp.).

    On the first official day of the12-day tour we met with our group of 25 Americans, consisting mostly of couples 40-70 in age, a family group of four, a couple traveling with friend, and two solo ladies (myself included). This day we went to the Egyptian Museum and had a tour provided by Assem, we walked over to the Ritz Carleton for lunch, and then boarded the bus for a drive across town to the Saladin Citadel and the Alabaster Mosque
    View All 7 City Tour Reviews
  • Pyramids
    We left the hotel at 7:15 AM and drove about 40 minutes (20 miles) to the ancient Old Kingdom capital Memphis. This is a huge and ancient (3000 BCE) archeological site, but a very small tourist site. We saw the alabaster sphinx, and the fallen statue of Ramses II. Then we headed to the nearby necropolis called Saqqara. There are numerous tombs and mastabas in this area several pyramids including the famous step pyramid of Djoser (~2600 BCE). There was an interesting museum and we learned about Imhotep the architect of Djoser’s pyramid.
    After this we went to an expensive carpet factory/toilet break and the drove about 10 miles to Giza. We had a photo stop at Khufu (~2500 BCE) pyramid, and could walk up to the entry, but we did not go in. Then we drove to Menkaura’s pyramid (~2500 BCE) where we could go inside. Again they said no pictures (so I left my camera), but the guard inside allowed photos for a tip. After this we all went for a camel ride ($11) and gave a $6 tip. It was very touristy but memorable. This was followed up with the Sphinx up close and lastly a stop at a very expensive “Cotton shop”.
    View All 16 Pyramids Reviews
  • Luxor
    The seventeen passengers who opted for the additional $120 hot air balloon excursion left at 4:45 am, boarded a van then a ferry across the Nile, and then vans to the hot air balloons. The balloon held 33 passengers in 8 compartments plus one with the operator. After we lifted off the ride was amazing. Sailing over the valleys of the Nobel’s, the Queens and the workers, but NOT the Valley of the Kings. It gave me a great perspective of the valley and the neighboring valleys. There were 100’s of tombs everywhere. We were airborne for about an hour then landed. It was very interesting to see the crew compress the balloon and contain it, took about 10 men.
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  • Colossi of Memnon
    Colossi of Memnon, more correctly the two massive stone statues of the Pharaoh Amenhotep III
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  • Karnak Temple
    Upon landing we immediately boarded a bus and drove into Luxor for a visit to the Karnack Temple, a 250-acre complex dedicated to Amun. The impressive Temple Hall with 134 columns is the world’s largest columnar structure.
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  • Luxor Temple
    Luxor Temple for sunset (3-6 PM), which was so lovely light up at night.
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  • Valley of the Kings
    At the Valley of the Kings you have to buy an extra camera ticket ($17), and you are checked rigorously in all the tombs. We saw three tombs. KV 2 (Ramses IV), KV 11 (Ramses III), and KV 14 the tomb built by the Queen Tausert and later taken over by her son Setnakht. The tombs walls were covered with beautiful carvings and colorful paintings. The Valley of the Kings was hot and dusty, but it was amazing, the fulfillment of a lifelong dream
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