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First, the NCL repositioning cruise from San Diego to Valparaiso and then from Valparaiso to Buenos Aires does not sell out. We met dozens of people that booked the first leg - San Diego to Valparaiso the day before departure and paid under $400.00/person for a very good cabin. Then there were people who were booking the second leg from Valparaiso to Buenos Aires when we were getting close to the end of the first leg and they were getting amazing prices on the second leg with good choices of cabins. If you can, book late and save big money on both of these cruises! The embarkation process in San Diego was delayed and it took much longer to get everyone on the ship, day one. They told us there was a chartered group the week before and they were really taking their time getting off the ship in San Diego. After everything was sorted out the ship left from San Diego late. The Norwegian Sun is one of the smaller ships in their fleet, but the rooms are clean and it appears the normal wear and tear of a cruise ship is being addressed regularly. On this cruise the main decks in the pool area were being refinished so they would mark off an area each day and the sanding and vacuuming would go on all day long. Thus, future passengers would benefit from refinished pool decks. The included options for food consist of a buffet and two dining rooms. There are also six extra charge restaurants on the ship. In the included restaurants the food is average at best. We did not feel that there was a great deal of flavor to many of the dishes served at the buffet or the restaurants. The service at the restaurants and the cabins was good. The personnel working in both the cabins and restaurants did not appear to be overly customer oriented, but were responsive when you engaged them in conversation. Overall, the entertainment on board was marginal each evening. On this 17 night cruise there were only a couple of acts that would be considered good and we spoke to many different guests during the day that agreed with our assessment of the entertainment. The exercise/gym area was split into two rooms. There was a smaller room with all exercise equipment and that room was typically full of people and many people had to wait for exercise machines in the mornings. The other room, next door was the larger of the two rooms and open for groups to use for stretching in the morning. The two pools and deck area is small but the group on this ship did not seem to be too crowded as there were many on the cruise who chose not to be outside much of the day. The Sun also had two golf hitting nets and a table tennis area. In the golf hitting nets there was only left handed clubs and a few old beat up golf balls in each net. If you are a left handed golfer, you’re in luck. The scheduled enrichment talks were not well done and mostly abandoned by the passengers the first week. The daily activities were minimal and not well attended nor well organized and run. The activities started late and were held in venues that did not have enough space for everyone so many people quit attending. In talking to others on the ship some had taken this cruise the year before and told us that the new NCL owners (not sure about the ownership change) had really cut back on everything including the food in the dining rooms, the drink prices had increased significantly and it seemed like their was a mandate from corporate to save money anywhere and everywhere possible. We talked with a number of passengers along the way and found people who thought the cruise was magnificent to those who felt that other cruise lines were better at almost everything on the ship. Everyone has their likes and dislikes when it comes to cruising and you can find someone on your cruise to agree with your point of view. PORTS Huatulco, MX - Has been upgraded in the last 18 months to include more shops, restaurants and bars. There are multiple options for shopping and eating in port, most places have wifi if you purchase food and/or drinks. There are some tours that leave from the port, many taxis are available in port and multiple beaches very close to the cruise dock as well. BTW, the boulevard that goes south from the port to the town is a good place to get a run in for those interested. Chiapas, MX - Very little to nothing available in this port. There are a few shops in the exit area, one with wifi if you buy 2 drinks, but there are so many people on the wifi that you get very little bandwidth, thus a super slow connection. They provide buses to the city for $10.00 round trip and the bus ride is 30 minutes each way. Not much to to do in the port area if you stay for the day. Chiapas is a small Mexican town with some shops, restaurants and bars. There are a few tours offered to local area coffee farms, some small ruins, etc. if you are so inclined. Antigua, Guatemala - The ship ports in an industrial port which is not well designed for tourists and cruise boats. They have tried to provide some shopping and dining options the port area, but those are minimal at best. There are a few shops with Guatemalan clothing and other hand made souvenirs available and all of the vendors accept USD. A couple of bars have opened and provide wifi, however, once again with everyone trying to get on the internet the connection is super slow and comes and goes - mostly goes. At the port there are taxis and multiple tour companies that will take you to Antiqua. The tour company cost is fixed and all charged $45.00 per person the day we were there. We have heard some days it is $50.00 per person. Driving straight to Antigua could be done in and hour, but most of the tour companies will take 1.5 to over 2 hours to get to Antigua. They like to stop multiple times to have you shop at little shops along the way. The tour company uses 12 passenger vans that are older, have 4 rows of seats, all have a flip down/up third seat in each row (which is the most uncomfortable seat in the row) and they put 12 people in a van before they leave for Antigua. If you have back problems you will be uncomfortable within the first hour on the van. The roads are have many bumps and the seats in the vans have very little cushion. We chose Viajes de Guatemala for our tour company and there are 3 or 4 different companies at the port all vying very hard to get your business. We stopped 3 times on the way to Antigua and it took over 2 hours to get there from the port. The tour guide took us to 2 different free museums and wanted us to go shopping at a central area where he could be with us at all times. Some of us wondered off to see the city on our own and were rounded up in 30 minutes to get back with the group. Downtown Antigua would be a very nice place to spend and afternoon and is not at all dangerous for tourists. USD are accepted everywhere and English is spoken by many Guatemalans. There are people walking around selling necklaces and woven items. If we could do it again, we would like to get a ride to Antigua and walk around for the afternoon and then ride back to the port. Our guide followed us very closely and then after we spent about an hour in the town took us to a restaurant on the way out of town where we were expected to buy our lunch. The restaurant was expensive for the town. We were then put back on the van, taken to the cross on the hill above the city for a picture option, put back on the van, taken to another museum for a short stop then to drive back to the ship. We talked to other guests on the ship and some were able to get a van or bus that went to Antigua allowed you to walk around for 3-4 hours then take you back to the port. We think we would look for this option next time as we prefer to spend out time walking about the town and not getting in and out of a van most of the time. Antigua is a very nice place to visit, we never felt uncomfortable in the town and would like to experience more of the town on another visit. Puntarenas, Costa Rica - We have visited many parts of Costa Rica over the years and feel it is most unfortunate that this port may be a first experience for people visiting Costa Rica on a cruise ship. This port is not in any way representative of the Costa Rican people or country. This port is dirty and the people are not gracious and helpful like most of the people in Costa Rica. You can walk from the ship to the city in less than 10 minutes. There are many vendors set up along the sidewalk between the main street and the beach most of which speak English and accept USD for almost anything you want to purchase. Also in this area are a number of outdoor restaurants and most have wifi if you buy something to eat or drink. We recommend leaving the ship and booking a tour at one of the tour companies located in the port area. The street that follows the beach is a good place for a 4 mile run. Zip lining is a great experience in Costa Rica. Salaverry, Peru (Trujillo is the nearest city) - Trujillo is a city of about 1 million people and the majority would be considered very poor in most countries. On the cruise ship we paid $15 for round tip buss transport from the port to the city of Trujillo or you can hire a taxi at the port. There is a main square with free wifi throughout the square (very nice for the city to provide wifi free) and there is a walking mall for about 1/2 mile that has many shops and restaurants. You can also take a city bus or taxi to Chan-Chan which is about 30 minutes by bus - 20 minutes by taxi. There are only a few ATM’s in the city, we discovered one in a Scotiabank along the walking mall. There are not too many souvenir shops in town, but the local people set up a number of tents in the parking lot of the dock area and you can get local products at a fair price from them just before you board the ship. At the port you can use USD and English can be used with the vendors. In the city Spanish is most helpful if you want to eat, drink or buy something along with Peruvian money. There are numerous police all around the town and we never felt threatened or unsafe anywhere in the city of Trujillo. Callao, Peru (Lima) - the port is again an industrial port which requires the cruise line to bus everyone out to the port gates to start their trip to town. We decided to take a taxi as that appeared to be a faster way to get to Lima in the morning. Most of the taxi drivers at the port want to have a day trip out of the port and will try to talk you into hiring them for 4 or 5 hours at about $25 USD per hour. We found a driver that would take us to downtown Lima and drop us off. The taxi ride to downtown Lima from the port gates is approximately 10 miles and due to traffic, excessive stop lights and signs, poor roads and way too much traffic for the roads the trip was almost 45 minutes with a 9:00 a.m. start from the port gates. We experienced the same type of difficulty on the return to the port and the return trip took even longer due to afternoon traffic. You should expect to pay around $25 USD each way in a taxi. One of the passengers decided to try walking from the taxi stop into the town of Callao and was robbed within blocks. We had read on Trip Advisor not to walk in this area and to only take taxi’s or busses from the port to the city. The center of the city is a traditional South American big city (@10 million people) with a square and the government buildings in the center of town. There is a walking mall in the center of town with many shops and restaurants along the way. In the square there are many police officers and tourism officials that can assist you with maps and directions. Most first time visitors to Lima will take the tour of the San Francisco cathedral (about $3.50 USD) as they take you to the catacombs in the basement. The English tour goes about once an hour and can be very crowded, e. g. over 20 people in the group. With so many people in a group it is difficult to hear the guide. Near the cathedral is the presidential palace and they have a changing of the guards ceremony a couple of times a day. There are some shop keepers and taxi drivers that will accept USD but for the most part you need to pay with a credit card or Nuevo Soles. There are many banks in the downtown area and you can also find people with green vests who walk along the streets and they will change your money. Downtown Lima seems safe and free of crime for tourists, we felt safe everywhere we walked in the downtown area. Arica, Chile - An industrial port that requires a shuttle from the ship to the port gates. When you arrive at the port gates the city is just across the street. The locals have set up a number of shops in tents at the park across the street that sell mostly hand made items. These small tent shops want to deal in USD for their hand made items. Some of the shops in town will take USD but most prefer Chilean money. The are plenty of ATM’s throughout the city. From the ship you will see a hill in the city with a large flag of Chili on top. The walk to the top of a hill is moderately strenuous and takes about a half hour to get to the top of the hill from the port gates. On top of the hill there is a small museum, some very old cannons (1867 vintage) and a statue of Jesus. In town there is a pedestrian mall and a narrow street that has mostly bars and restaurants. Many of the bars and restaurants have wifi if you purchase food or drinks. Some of the restaurants you will come across will advertise wifi, but if they have a weak signal you won’t be able to log on and if you do it is extremely slow, so ask people at the tables about the signal before sitting down and ordering. There are a couple of museums in town and some historical statues that you can spend time viewing. It is a nice town and feels safe, however, the waiter at the bar/restaurant we stopped at in the restaurant row area told me to keep my camera in my backpack and not on the table. Be aware of your surroundings as is good advice in any city, especially the tourist areas. Coquimbo, Chile - They are working on many upgrades to this port in 2016 and it appears that in 2017 it will have a very different look. The current status of the port includes a small port building about 200 yards from the ship. The port building has free wifi (1000 passengers and crew really suck up the bandwidth quick) and some tourism representatives to assist you in planning your daily activities. You can walk through the port gates and across the street to the town of Coquimbo which has a couple of main streets that you can shop or sit for coffee, beer or some food. The large cross on the hill can be seen from the ship and almost anywhere in town. We also took the city bus (#1) that you can catch across the street from the port and for 600 Chilean pesos you can ride the bus to La Serena about 10 miles to the north. The bus will take 30 + minutes as it stops many times between the two cities. In La Serena the downtown area is filled with shops, restaurants and many more things to see and do compared to Coquimbo. In the downtown area of La Serena there are many artisan tents with hand made items that are truly one of a kind. Both cities can be toured in one day by using the city bus to go over and back or you can hire a cab right at the port gates. In Coquimbo, two of our fellow passengers were robbed at gun point on one of the switchback stairs going up to the cross on the hill. One can never emphasize enough the importance of traveling in groups and staying in safe areas. The people are very welcoming and we felt safe traveling in both cities. We were lucky to meet a couple on the bus to La Serena that wanted to take us to the downtown area and show us around. Try your Spanish with the passengers on the city bus and you can get a guided tour! Valparaiso, Chile - This was the final stop for this cruise and the beginning of the next cruise to Buenos Aires, Argentina. We spent the day in Valparaiso as the ship was not leaving until the evening. Valparaiso port is quite inconvenient requiring 2 different shuttle busses to get to the port gates. The trip from the ship to the port gates took us 2 hours and when we talked to others on the ship the same trip took many of them over 2 hours and some gave up trying to get to the city after 2 hours. Outside the port gates we were constantly cautioned to keep our camera out of site and wear your backpack on your chest to avoid having anything stolen. We took the city bus (350 Chilean Pesos) from the street across from port gates south to Plaza Sotamayor where we met a guide that does tours for tips. The tour guides hang out at the statue in the middle of the plaza and wear green shirts. The tour was about 2.5 hours and took us through the downtown area with many stops to explain historical buildings and the history behind the entire city. Valparaiso is a very hilly town with a great deal of traffic on narrow streets. The tour was well worth the time and money as the tour guide told us so much about the city and the country. Tour guides are available in multiple languages and when you ask about the tour they will separate you into the language group you feel most comfortable. There are numerous bars/restaurants along the main streets near the plazas and all are inviting with good prices for food and drink.

This cruise does not sell out - book late and save $

Norwegian Sun Cruise Review by Tanndance

13 people found this helpful
Trip Details
  • Sail Date: November 2016
  • Destination: South America
  • Cabin Type: Inside
First, the NCL repositioning cruise from San Diego to Valparaiso and then from Valparaiso to Buenos Aires does not sell out. We met dozens of people that booked the first leg - San Diego to Valparaiso the day before departure and paid under $400.00/person for a very good cabin. Then there were people who were booking the second leg from Valparaiso to Buenos Aires when we were getting close to the end of the first leg and they were getting amazing prices on the second leg with good choices of cabins. If you can, book late and save big money on both of these cruises!

The embarkation process in San Diego was delayed and it took much longer to get everyone on the ship, day one. They told us there was a chartered group the week before and they were really taking their time getting off the ship in San Diego. After everything was sorted out the ship left from San Diego late. The Norwegian Sun is one of the smaller ships in their fleet, but the rooms are clean and it appears the normal wear and tear of a cruise ship is being addressed regularly. On this cruise the main decks in the pool area were being refinished so they would mark off an area each day and the sanding and vacuuming would go on all day long. Thus, future passengers would benefit from refinished pool decks.

The included options for food consist of a buffet and two dining rooms. There are also six extra charge restaurants on the ship. In the included restaurants the food is average at best. We did not feel that there was a great deal of flavor to many of the dishes served at the buffet or the restaurants. The service at the restaurants and the cabins was good. The personnel working in both the cabins and restaurants did not appear to be overly customer oriented, but were responsive when you engaged them in conversation.

Overall, the entertainment on board was marginal each evening. On this 17 night cruise there were only a couple of acts that would be considered good and we spoke to many different guests during the day that agreed with our assessment of the entertainment. The exercise/gym area was split into two rooms. There was a smaller room with all exercise equipment and that room was typically full of people and many people had to wait for exercise machines in the mornings. The other room, next door was the larger of the two rooms and open for groups to use for stretching in the morning. The two pools and deck area is small but the group on this ship did not seem to be too crowded as there were many on the cruise who chose not to be outside much of the day. The Sun also had two golf hitting nets and a table tennis area. In the golf hitting nets there was only left handed clubs and a few old beat up golf balls in each net. If you are a left handed golfer, you’re in luck.

The scheduled enrichment talks were not well done and mostly abandoned by the passengers the first week. The daily activities were minimal and not well attended nor well organized and run. The activities started late and were held in venues that did not have enough space for everyone so many people quit attending. In talking to others on the ship some had taken this cruise the year before and told us that the new NCL owners (not sure about the ownership change) had really cut back on everything including the food in the dining rooms, the drink prices had increased significantly and it seemed like their was a mandate from corporate to save money anywhere and everywhere possible. We talked with a number of passengers along the way and found people who thought the cruise was magnificent to those who felt that other cruise lines were better at almost everything on the ship. Everyone has their likes and dislikes when it comes to cruising and you can find someone on your cruise to agree with your point of view.

PORTS

Huatulco, MX - Has been upgraded in the last 18 months to include more shops, restaurants and bars. There are multiple options for shopping and eating in port, most places have wifi if you purchase food and/or drinks. There are some tours that leave from the port, many taxis are available in port and multiple beaches very close to the cruise dock as well. BTW, the boulevard that goes south from the port to the town is a good place to get a run in for those interested.

Chiapas, MX - Very little to nothing available in this port. There are a few shops in the exit area, one with wifi if you buy 2 drinks, but there are so many people on the wifi that you get very little bandwidth, thus a super slow connection. They provide buses to the city for $10.00 round trip and the bus ride is 30 minutes each way. Not much to to do in the port area if you stay for the day. Chiapas is a small Mexican town with some shops, restaurants and bars. There are a few tours offered to local area coffee farms, some small ruins, etc. if you are so inclined.

Antigua, Guatemala - The ship ports in an industrial port which is not well designed for tourists and cruise boats. They have tried to provide some shopping and dining options the port area, but those are minimal at best. There are a few shops with Guatemalan clothing and other hand made souvenirs available and all of the vendors accept USD. A couple of bars have opened and provide wifi, however, once again with everyone trying to get on the internet the connection is super slow and comes and goes - mostly goes. At the port there are taxis and multiple tour companies that will take you to Antiqua. The tour company cost is fixed and all charged $45.00 per person the day we were there. We have heard some days it is $50.00 per person. Driving straight to Antigua could be done in and hour, but most of the tour companies will take 1.5 to over 2 hours to get to Antigua. They like to stop multiple times to have you shop at little shops along the way. The tour company uses 12 passenger vans that are older, have 4 rows of seats, all have a flip down/up third seat in each row (which is the most uncomfortable seat in the row) and they put 12 people in a van before they leave for Antigua. If you have back problems you will be uncomfortable within the first hour on the van. The roads are have many bumps and the seats in the vans have very little cushion.

We chose Viajes de Guatemala for our tour company and there are 3 or 4 different companies at the port all vying very hard to get your business. We stopped 3 times on the way to Antigua and it took over 2 hours to get there from the port. The tour guide took us to 2 different free museums and wanted us to go shopping at a central area where he could be with us at all times. Some of us wondered off to see the city on our own and were rounded up in 30 minutes to get back with the group. Downtown Antigua would be a very nice place to spend and afternoon and is not at all dangerous for tourists. USD are accepted everywhere and English is spoken by many Guatemalans. There are people walking around selling necklaces and woven items. If we could do it again, we would like to get a ride to Antigua and walk around for the afternoon and then ride back to the port. Our guide followed us very closely and then after we spent about an hour in the town took us to a restaurant on the way out of town where we were expected to buy our lunch. The restaurant was expensive for the town. We were then put back on the van, taken to the cross on the hill above the city for a picture option, put back on the van, taken to another museum for a short stop then to drive back to the ship.

We talked to other guests on the ship and some were able to get a van or bus that went to Antigua allowed you to walk around for 3-4 hours then take you back to the port. We think we would look for this option next time as we prefer to spend out time walking about the town and not getting in and out of a van most of the time. Antigua is a very nice place to visit, we never felt uncomfortable in the town and would like to experience more of the town on another visit.

Puntarenas, Costa Rica - We have visited many parts of Costa Rica over the years and feel it is most unfortunate that this port may be a first experience for people visiting Costa Rica on a cruise ship. This port is not in any way representative of the Costa Rican people or country. This port is dirty and the people are not gracious and helpful like most of the people in Costa Rica. You can walk from the ship to the city in less than 10 minutes. There are many vendors set up along the sidewalk between the main street and the beach most of which speak English and accept USD for almost anything you want to purchase. Also in this area are a number of outdoor restaurants and most have wifi if you buy something to eat or drink. We recommend leaving the ship and booking a tour at one of the tour companies located in the port area. The street that follows the beach is a good place for a 4 mile run. Zip lining is a great experience in Costa Rica.

Salaverry, Peru (Trujillo is the nearest city) - Trujillo is a city of about 1 million people and the majority would be considered very poor in most countries. On the cruise ship we paid $15 for round tip buss transport from the port to the city of Trujillo or you can hire a taxi at the port. There is a main square with free wifi throughout the square (very nice for the city to provide wifi free) and there is a walking mall for about 1/2 mile that has many shops and restaurants. You can also take a city bus or taxi to Chan-Chan which is about 30 minutes by bus - 20 minutes by taxi. There are only a few ATM’s in the city, we discovered one in a Scotiabank along the walking mall. There are not too many souvenir shops in town, but the local people set up a number of tents in the parking lot of the dock area and you can get local products at a fair price from them just before you board the ship. At the port you can use USD and English can be used with the vendors. In the city Spanish is most helpful if you want to eat, drink or buy something along with Peruvian money. There are numerous police all around the town and we never felt threatened or unsafe anywhere in the city of Trujillo.

Callao, Peru (Lima) - the port is again an industrial port which requires the cruise line to bus everyone out to the port gates to start their trip to town. We decided to take a taxi as that appeared to be a faster way to get to Lima in the morning. Most of the taxi drivers at the port want to have a day trip out of the port and will try to talk you into hiring them for 4 or 5 hours at about $25 USD per hour. We found a driver that would take us to downtown Lima and drop us off. The taxi ride to downtown Lima from the port gates is approximately 10 miles and due to traffic, excessive stop lights and signs, poor roads and way too much traffic for the roads the trip was almost 45 minutes with a 9:00 a.m. start from the port gates. We experienced the same type of difficulty on the return to the port and the return trip took even longer due to afternoon traffic. You should expect to pay around $25 USD each way in a taxi. One of the passengers decided to try walking from the taxi stop into the town of Callao and was robbed within blocks. We had read on Trip Advisor not to walk in this area and to only take taxi’s or busses from the port to the city.

The center of the city is a traditional South American big city (@10 million people) with a square and the government buildings in the center of town. There is a walking mall in the center of town with many shops and restaurants along the way. In the square there are many police officers and tourism officials that can assist you with maps and directions. Most first time visitors to Lima will take the tour of the San Francisco cathedral (about $3.50 USD) as they take you to the catacombs in the basement. The English tour goes about once an hour and can be very crowded, e. g. over 20 people in the group. With so many people in a group it is difficult to hear the guide. Near the cathedral is the presidential palace and they have a changing of the guards ceremony a couple of times a day. There are some shop keepers and taxi drivers that will accept USD but for the most part you need to pay with a credit card or Nuevo Soles. There are many banks in the downtown area and you can also find people with green vests who walk along the streets and they will change your money. Downtown Lima seems safe and free of crime for tourists, we felt safe everywhere we walked in the downtown area.

Arica, Chile - An industrial port that requires a shuttle from the ship to the port gates. When you arrive at the port gates the city is just across the street. The locals have set up a number of shops in tents at the park across the street that sell mostly hand made items. These small tent shops want to deal in USD for their hand made items. Some of the shops in town will take USD but most prefer Chilean money. The are plenty of ATM’s throughout the city. From the ship you will see a hill in the city with a large flag of Chili on top. The walk to the top of a hill is moderately strenuous and takes about a half hour to get to the top of the hill from the port gates. On top of the hill there is a small museum, some very old cannons (1867 vintage) and a statue of Jesus. In town there is a pedestrian mall and a narrow street that has mostly bars and restaurants. Many of the bars and restaurants have wifi if you purchase food or drinks. Some of the restaurants you will come across will advertise wifi, but if they have a weak signal you won’t be able to log on and if you do it is extremely slow, so ask people at the tables about the signal before sitting down and ordering. There are a couple of museums in town and some historical statues that you can spend time viewing. It is a nice town and feels safe, however, the waiter at the bar/restaurant we stopped at in the restaurant row area told me to keep my camera in my backpack and not on the table. Be aware of your surroundings as is good advice in any city, especially the tourist areas.

Coquimbo, Chile - They are working on many upgrades to this port in 2016 and it appears that in 2017 it will have a very different look. The current status of the port includes a small port building about 200 yards from the ship. The port building has free wifi (1000 passengers and crew really suck up the bandwidth quick) and some tourism representatives to assist you in planning your daily activities. You can walk through the port gates and across the street to the town of Coquimbo which has a couple of main streets that you can shop or sit for coffee, beer or some food. The large cross on the hill can be seen from the ship and almost anywhere in town. We also took the city bus (#1) that you can catch across the street from the port and for 600 Chilean pesos you can ride the bus to La Serena about 10 miles to the north. The bus will take 30 + minutes as it stops many times between the two cities. In La Serena the downtown area is filled with shops, restaurants and many more things to see and do compared to Coquimbo. In the downtown area of La Serena there are many artisan tents with hand made items that are truly one of a kind. Both cities can be toured in one day by using the city bus to go over and back or you can hire a cab right at the port gates. In Coquimbo, two of our fellow passengers were robbed at gun point on one of the switchback stairs going up to the cross on the hill. One can never emphasize enough the importance of traveling in groups and staying in safe areas. The people are very welcoming and we felt safe traveling in both cities. We were lucky to meet a couple on the bus to La Serena that wanted to take us to the downtown area and show us around. Try your Spanish with the passengers on the city bus and you can get a guided tour!

Valparaiso, Chile - This was the final stop for this cruise and the beginning of the next cruise to Buenos Aires, Argentina. We spent the day in Valparaiso as the ship was not leaving until the evening. Valparaiso port is quite inconvenient requiring 2 different shuttle busses to get to the port gates. The trip from the ship to the port gates took us 2 hours and when we talked to others on the ship the same trip took many of them over 2 hours and some gave up trying to get to the city after 2 hours. Outside the port gates we were constantly cautioned to keep our camera out of site and wear your backpack on your chest to avoid having anything stolen. We took the city bus (350 Chilean Pesos) from the street across from port gates south to Plaza Sotamayor where we met a guide that does tours for tips. The tour guides hang out at the statue in the middle of the plaza and wear green shirts. The tour was about 2.5 hours and took us through the downtown area with many stops to explain historical buildings and the history behind the entire city. Valparaiso is a very hilly town with a great deal of traffic on narrow streets. The tour was well worth the time and money as the tour guide told us so much about the city and the country. Tour guides are available in multiple languages and when you ask about the tour they will separate you into the language group you feel most comfortable. There are numerous bars/restaurants along the main streets near the plazas and all are inviting with good prices for food and drink.
Tanndance’s Full Rating Summary
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Cabin Review

Inside
Cabin ID 736
Average cabin for an interior, deck 7 near the elevators which was nice.
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