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We recently sailed on the Seven Seas Mariner on the 72-night Panama to Patagonia Grand Voyage. We wanted to take a bit of time before writing this review so that it was written from a thoughtful perspective rather that an emotional viewpoint. We have been sailing with RSSC since 2007, and have logged 391 nights having sailed on several world cruises and grand voyages. On each voyage we enjoyed the experiences and we were really looking forward to circumnavigating South America. Several reasons that we chose to take this voyage rather than segments of the world cruise were that 1) we had never been south of Lima or south of Rio, so a huge portion of this cruise was going to be new areas to us; 2) We had never been to the Falkland Islands; 3) We enjoy fjords and glaciers; and 4) We had never been to Devil's Island. But to say we were disappointed with our recent experience would be an understatement. We are also deeply disappointed by the resolution proposed by Regent Seven Seas in regards to future cruise credits. We traveled on a Regent arranged flight overnight, arriving approximately 8:00 a.m., in Miami. There we were informed by Regent representatives that we would have to wait at the airport terminal for at least 90 minutes before being transported to the ship. We thought this was very odd, as we were certain we would not be able to board until the ship had been disembarked. Once we arrived at the cruise terminal at approximately 10a.m., we were informed by the cruise gate security agents that we could not enter the cruise terminal until noon, at the earliest. Accordingly we had to stand outside for two hours as there are no benches or seats to speak of. Now we waited another stretch of time while the ships personnel tried to get the computer systems working. That process took well over an hour, and we were finally processed very slowly as very few terminals were working. So our cruise started with a very stressful state of affairs. During the first leg of the journey (Miami to Lima), we commented to a number of officers including the Captain about the lack of any special events for the "Grand Voyagers." Typically there have been special welcome dinners or cocktail hours for the Grand Voyagers so we would get to know our fellow long-term passengers. We were told several times something would be scheduled, but nothing ever was. During the second leg of the journey (Lima to Buenos Aires), evidently several embarking guests came on board bearing a gastrointestinal ("GI") bug that spread quickly throughout the ship. We also found out from crew members that many of the sick passengers were told to isolate themselves in their cabins, but decided to disregard these orders, and further contaminated the ship. So for nearly the entire time of this segment we were subjected to "code red" procedures which limited access to many amenities. It was during this segment that we started missing ports. The first missed port was Iquique, Chile. Then Coquimbo, Chile. Then on the 8th or 9th we were told the ship had possibly picked up a fishing net in one of the pods, and that cruising speed would be effected. It was reported that we would not be going to the Amalia Glacier due to weather concerns. It was also reported a couple days later that we would not be going to the Falkland Islands due to weather concerns. However, in Montevideo, we met up with a ship that was paralleling our cruise route. It turns out that they were in the Falklands on the same day the Mariner was scheduled to be there and there were no weather related issues at all. Now the cruise really got interesting, and not in a good way. During the third segment (Buenos Aires to Rio) the GI bug continued to pop up and limit our access to amenities. Then in Santos, Brazil, we were informed the auxiliary generator had failed its regularly scheduled test, so we would be docked there until further notice. Due to that problem, we missed three additional Brazilian ports... Ilha Grande, Parati, and Buzios. Then the fourth segment (Rio to Miami) and missed yet another port, Devil's Island. We truly feel let down by the miscommunication, conflicting offers of credits, and the overall amount that Regent thinks is adequate compensation. We missed 8 ports or experiences out of a possible 47 which is over 17%. .

Think Twice

Seven Seas Mariner Cruise Review by oregonbrewski

67 people found this helpful
Trip Details
We recently sailed on the Seven Seas Mariner on the 72-night Panama to Patagonia Grand Voyage. We wanted to take a bit of time before writing this review so that it was written from a thoughtful perspective rather that an emotional viewpoint.

We have been sailing with RSSC since 2007, and have logged 391 nights having sailed on several world cruises and grand voyages. On each voyage we enjoyed the experiences and we were really looking forward to circumnavigating South America. Several reasons that we chose to take this voyage rather than segments of the world cruise were that 1) we had never been south of Lima or south of Rio, so a huge portion of this cruise was going to be new areas to us; 2) We had never been to the Falkland Islands; 3) We enjoy fjords and glaciers; and 4) We had never been to Devil's Island.

But to say we were disappointed with our recent experience would be an understatement. We are also deeply disappointed by the resolution proposed by Regent Seven Seas in regards to future cruise credits.

We traveled on a Regent arranged flight overnight, arriving approximately 8:00 a.m., in Miami. There we were informed by Regent representatives that we would have to wait at the airport terminal for at least 90 minutes before being transported to the ship. We thought this was very odd, as we were certain we would not be able to board until the ship had been disembarked. Once we arrived at the cruise terminal at approximately 10a.m., we were informed by the cruise gate security agents that we could not enter the cruise terminal until noon, at the earliest. Accordingly we had to stand outside for two hours as there are no benches or seats to speak of.

Now we waited another stretch of time while the ships personnel tried to get the computer systems working. That process took well over an hour, and we were finally processed very slowly as very few terminals were working. So our cruise started with a very stressful state of affairs.

During the first leg of the journey (Miami to Lima), we commented to a number of officers including the Captain about the lack of any special events for the "Grand Voyagers." Typically there have been special welcome dinners or cocktail hours for the Grand Voyagers so we would get to know our fellow long-term passengers. We were told several times something would be scheduled, but nothing ever was.

During the second leg of the journey (Lima to Buenos Aires), evidently several embarking guests came on board bearing a gastrointestinal ("GI") bug that spread quickly throughout the ship. We also found out from crew members that many of the sick passengers were told to isolate themselves in their cabins, but decided to disregard these orders, and further contaminated the ship. So for nearly the entire time of this segment we were subjected to "code red" procedures which limited access to many amenities. It was during this segment that we started missing ports.

The first missed port was Iquique, Chile. Then Coquimbo, Chile. Then on the 8th or 9th we were told the ship had possibly picked up a fishing net in one of the pods, and that cruising speed would be effected. It was reported that we would not be going to the Amalia Glacier due to weather concerns. It was also reported a couple days later that we would not be going to the Falkland Islands due to weather concerns. However, in Montevideo, we met up with a ship that was paralleling our cruise route. It turns out that they were in the Falklands on the same day the Mariner was scheduled to be there and there were no weather related issues at all.

Now the cruise really got interesting, and not in a good way. During the third segment (Buenos Aires to Rio) the GI bug continued to pop up and limit our access to amenities.

Then in Santos, Brazil, we were informed the auxiliary generator had failed its regularly scheduled test, so we would be docked there until further notice. Due to that problem, we missed three additional Brazilian ports... Ilha Grande, Parati, and Buzios.

Then the fourth segment (Rio to Miami) and missed yet another port, Devil's Island.

We truly feel let down by the miscommunication, conflicting offers of credits, and the overall amount that Regent thinks is adequate compensation. We missed 8 ports or experiences out of a possible 47 which is over 17%. .
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