I was very unsure about going on the Diamant the first time in January 2010 (I was afraid of being seasick - tablets on board are brilliant, a brand we don't have in the UK), but I came home feeling I'd found my heaven on earth. I've now been on 5 trips in 6 years. If I could afford to go three times a year I would. I have made lots of very close friends from each trip. Last month I shared a cabin with a lady I met the previous year. I feel very safe and very happy on board. I'm greeted with big hugs from crew members now as I've got to know some of them well. The crew maintain high professional standards while also being very friendly and welcoming. They will do what they can to meet your individual needs, and have a laugh (I like my salads naked - something one crew member remembered from my previous trip 15 months!) The food This is amazing, no doubt at all about that, on both Sagitta and Diamant. I'm a fussy eater and love the meals on board. If there was occasionally an aspect of a meal I didn't like it never mattered - I would like most of the food, and another meal was always just around the corner. I love the freedom to help yourself to water or a variety of soft drinks (what Americans call 'sodas'!) at any time. Sailing The sails are put up whenever there is enough wind. In practice this means the sails go up most days but not every day. Everyone loves it when they are up so the crew do their best to have them up as much as possible. 12 Day Trips The extended trips are the ones I go for every time. 6 days is too short. I've done 12 days on Diamant going to/from Grenada down to St Vincent via about 10 Grenadine Islands. I adore the little islands, they are less developed and less touristy. I've also done 12 days on Sagitta to/from St Maarten down to Dominica (via St Kitts, Nevis, Saba, Guadaloupe, Isle de Saintes, Montserrat, Anguilla and St Barths - those are the islands I can remember right now) - an interesting trip as the Islands were all very different. I loved the French ones best, and Monserrat was fascinating to see post-volcanic eruption. My trip in January 2015 was 12 days starting in St Thomas and ending in St Maarten (via Tortolla, Norman Island, Sandy Cay, Cooper Island, Jost Van Dyke (fab!), Virgin Gorda, Tintamarre Island, Anguilla and St Barths again). I think there was more actual sailing on the Dominica trip as the BVIs are very close together. I adore beautiful empty beaches and clear seas for swimming and the BVIs were amazing for me. There is more culture and visits/excursions on the Dominica trip, and more tourist-type activities (shopping, old forts, scuba diving.) There were water sports such as paddle boards and kayaks in several places in the BVIs. Diamant and Sagitta The two boats and general life on board - Diamant is gorgeous, small and more informal and personal. You get to know the 12 passengers and 6 crew really well. The cabins on the Diamant are smaller than Sagitta's but all are air conditioned and beautiful. The ensuite shower rooms are roomy with enough surfaces, hair dryers and excellent hot showers. The wood everywhere is a joy to touch and look at on both boats. You get clean towels every 3 days and clean sheets after 6 days. Everywhere is spotlessly clean (felt strange seeing men do the cleaning....my ex- husband and my Dad never did any, ever.) Sagitta is bigger taking 24 passengers and has 10 crew. Rules have to be stricter and it is a little more formal with more people to keep safe and happy. The cabins are bigger with more storage and are spread over two decks rather than one. There are two single cabins - they are tiny, and they share one shower room. However, there is a large comfy seating area right beside the two singles which is rarely used by other passengers. I have shared a cabin with a stranger twice, and come away with 2 new great friends. The Sagitta has plenty of sun loungers on deck and upright 'director' chairs, and the Diamant has new upright chairs but no loungers. I felt it was quite 'posh' when I first went on Sagitta because of the loungers. There are rubber/foam mats you can lie out on deck on Diamant or you sit on the beautiful wooden seats. On the back of both boats there are the seating-dining areas with cushioned seating. There is plenty of shade on both boats if you need it. People tend to read and chat on board, and after the evening meal many passengers go to their cabins. The more sociable stay up later (helped along by alcohol for some) socialising and playing the odd game or two until 11-11.30pm, but most people prefer to retire early and get up early. On a few islands we did leave the boat after dinner to party at local bars (Foxy's on Jost Van Dyke was lively, busy and included dancing.) Breakfast is at 8am, and coffee and freshly made mini cakes are available from about 6.30 or 7am I believe (I'm not an early bird!!) You never need to wear shoes on board but they do like you to wear a shirt at breakfast and shorts/skirts/dresses and tops at dinner ie no swim wear at dinner. Home ports I highly recommend staying a couple of nights in Grenada or St Maarten or St Thomas before you board. It allows you to recover from a tiring journey and adjust to Island time and heat. At least one night at the end is an added bonus but not so important. The hotels are expensive but cheaper ones are still pretty good by European standards. They charge by the room and not per person as in the UK, and breakfast is not generally included. If you want to keep costs down buy drinks (especially water) at local supermarkets and keep them in your room fridge. The local buses are great and cost just $1 for most trips. Just ask locals where to get the bus and where to get off. They are very friendly and helpful. Taxis are expensive and the open local buses are much more fun. The Islands where you board all have good shopping (mainly closed on Sundays unless big cruise ships are also in port - shops open for big cruise passengers on any day of the week.) Swim wear is not considered appropriate in the towns anywhere in the Caribbean, unlike European resort towns. They are far more conservative than the British! Oh, and it's illegal to wear camouflage shorts or shirts on Grenada. Luggage Pack a basic change of clothes, swimsuit and important items in your hand luggage. It is not uncommon for luggage to arrive a day or two late (mine arrived a week late for my first trip, and I'd only gone for a week...!) There is one socket in the cabin so an adaptor with multi-ports for recharging phones, iPads etc is useful. The snorkel equipment the boats have for you to borrow is excellent, and you keep your set for the trip. I highly recommend travelling with Island Windjammers.  

My Heaven on Earth

Sagitta Cruise Review by Sally Shipsey

1 person found this helpful
Trip Details
I was very unsure about going on the Diamant the first time in January 2010 (I was afraid of being seasick - tablets on board are brilliant, a brand we don't have in the UK), but I came home feeling I'd found my heaven on earth. I've now been on 5 trips in 6 years. If I could afford to go three times a year I would. I have made lots of very close friends from each trip. Last month I shared a cabin with a lady I met the previous year. I feel very safe and very happy on board. I'm greeted with big hugs from crew members now as I've got to know some of them well. The crew maintain high professional standards while also being very friendly and welcoming. They will do what they can to meet your individual needs, and have a laugh (I like my salads naked - something one crew member remembered from my previous trip 15 months!)
The food
This is amazing, no doubt at all about that, on both Sagitta and Diamant. I'm a fussy eater and love the meals on board. If there was occasionally an aspect of a meal I didn't like it never mattered - I would like most of the food, and another meal was always just around the corner. I love the freedom to help yourself to water or a variety of soft drinks (what Americans call 'sodas'!) at any time.
Sailing
The sails are put up whenever there is enough wind. In practice this means the sails go up most days but not every day. Everyone loves it when they are up so the crew do their best to have them up as much as possible.
12 Day Trips
The extended trips are the ones I go for every time. 6 days is too short. I've done 12 days on Diamant going to/from Grenada down to St Vincent via about 10 Grenadine Islands. I adore the little islands, they are less developed and less touristy. I've also done 12 days on Sagitta to/from St Maarten down to Dominica (via St Kitts, Nevis, Saba, Guadaloupe, Isle de Saintes, Montserrat, Anguilla and St Barths - those are the islands I can remember right now) - an interesting trip as the Islands were all very different. I loved the French ones best, and Monserrat was fascinating to see post-volcanic eruption. My trip in January 2015 was 12 days starting in St Thomas and ending in St Maarten (via Tortolla, Norman Island, Sandy Cay, Cooper Island, Jost Van Dyke (fab!), Virgin Gorda, Tintamarre Island, Anguilla and St Barths again). I think there was more actual sailing on the Dominica trip as the BVIs are very close together. I adore beautiful empty beaches and clear seas for swimming and the BVIs were amazing for me. There is more culture and visits/excursions on the Dominica trip, and more tourist-type activities (shopping, old forts, scuba diving.) There were water sports such as paddle boards and kayaks in several places in the BVIs.
Diamant and Sagitta
The two boats and general life on board - Diamant is gorgeous, small and more informal and personal. You get to know the 12 passengers and 6 crew really well. The cabins on the Diamant are smaller than Sagitta's but all are air conditioned and beautiful. The ensuite shower rooms are roomy with enough surfaces, hair dryers and excellent hot showers. The wood everywhere is a joy to touch and look at on both boats. You get clean towels every 3 days and clean sheets after 6 days. Everywhere is spotlessly clean (felt strange seeing men do the cleaning....my ex- husband and my Dad never did any, ever.)
Sagitta is bigger taking 24 passengers and has 10 crew. Rules have to be stricter and it is a little more formal with more people to keep safe and happy. The cabins are bigger with more storage and are spread over two decks rather than one. There are two single cabins - they are tiny, and they share one shower room. However, there is a large comfy seating area right beside the two singles which is rarely used by other passengers. I have shared a cabin with a stranger twice, and come away with 2 new great friends. The Sagitta has plenty of sun loungers on deck and upright 'director' chairs, and the Diamant has new upright chairs but no loungers. I felt it was quite 'posh' when I first went on Sagitta because of the loungers. There are rubber/foam mats you can lie out on deck on Diamant or you sit on the beautiful wooden seats. On the back of both boats there are the seating-dining areas with cushioned seating. There is plenty of shade on both boats if you need it. People tend to read and chat on board, and after the evening meal many passengers go to their cabins. The more sociable stay up later (helped along by alcohol for some) socialising and playing the odd game or two until 11-11.30pm, but most people prefer to retire early and get up early. On a few islands we did leave the boat after dinner to party at local bars (Foxy's on Jost Van Dyke was lively, busy and included dancing.) Breakfast is at 8am, and coffee and freshly made mini cakes are available from about 6.30 or 7am I believe (I'm not an early bird!!)
You never need to wear shoes on board but they do like you to wear a shirt at breakfast and shorts/skirts/dresses and tops at dinner ie no swim wear at dinner.
Home ports
I highly recommend staying a couple of nights in Grenada or St Maarten or St Thomas before you board. It allows you to recover from a tiring journey and adjust to Island time and heat. At least one night at the end is an added bonus but not so important. The hotels are expensive but cheaper ones are still pretty good by European standards. They charge by the room and not per person as in the UK, and breakfast is not generally included. If you want to keep costs down buy drinks (especially water) at local supermarkets and keep them in your room fridge. The local buses are great and cost just $1 for most trips. Just ask locals where to get the bus and where to get off. They are very friendly and helpful. Taxis are expensive and the open local buses are much more fun. The Islands where you board all have good shopping (mainly closed on Sundays unless big cruise ships are also in port - shops open for big cruise passengers on any day of the week.) Swim wear is not considered appropriate in the towns anywhere in the Caribbean, unlike European resort towns. They are far more conservative than the British! Oh, and it's illegal to wear camouflage shorts or shirts on Grenada.
Luggage
Pack a basic change of clothes, swimsuit and important items in your hand luggage. It is not uncommon for luggage to arrive a day or two late (mine arrived a week late for my first trip, and I'd only gone for a week...!) There is one socket in the cabin so an adaptor with multi-ports for recharging phones, iPads etc is useful. The snorkel equipment the boats have for you to borrow is excellent, and you keep your set for the trip.
I highly recommend travelling with Island Windjammers.
 
Sally Shipsey’s Full Rating Summary
Enrichment Activities
Value For Money
Embarkation
Dining
Public Rooms
Entertainment
Cabin
Fitness & Recreation
Shore Excursions
Service
Free Price Drop Alerts
Get Island Windjammers Sagitta price drops
250,000+ people have entered their email
By proceeding, you agree to Cruise Critic’s Privacy Policy and Terms of Use.

Cabin Review

Cabin 6
Air conditioned 2 bunk beds, 2 deep large drawers, one wardrobe with about 8 hangars. Ensuite shower room with plenty of space and a hair dryer.