My wife and I are in our early sixties. We went on a Royal Caribbean cruise of the Caribbean about 20 years ago, were disappointed with the food, unhappy with our table partners and not impressed with the service or shore excursions. We swore off cruising after that. A friend convinced us to join them on the Renaissance R7 for a cruise from Barcelona to Dover seven years ago, and we were much happier. Then three years ago we went with friends on the RSSC Seven Seas Mariner to Alaska [chosen because it had good food!] and we were hooked. Last year we took the Paul Gauguin around French Polynesia. This year we looked for a RSSC cruise to the Greek Islands. We couldn't find one that met our schedule, and found the Oceania Nautica had an itinerary with everything we were looking for, plus Amalfi, Taormina, Kotor, Dubrovnik and Venice, all for the same price as the RSSC seven day cruise. It was an offer we couldn't refuse. The Nautica is almost identical to the R7, so we knew we'd like the boat. Oceania's reputation for food was as good as Radisson/Regent's, so we were comfortable there. I was somewhat concerned about the nickel and diming of charging for cokes, bottled water, and wine with dinner and add-on tips, but we decided to try it. As a result, this review will tend to compare Oceania with RSSC. In brief, the cruise met our expectations, exceeded some, and was at least as good a value-for-money as the RSSC. The food was outstanding, the crew excellent and the ship comfortable. The itinerary was a highlight. The Nautica began the fifteen day cruise in Istanbul, spent a day going through the Dardanelles and down the Aegean Coast to Kusadasi, then Rhodes, Mykonos/Delos, Athens, Santorini, then a day through the Straights of Messina to Amalfi, back to Taormina and across the Adriatic to Kotor in Montenegro, Dubrovnik, then up to Venice. One night was provided on-board in port at both ends. It's an itinerary unlike many of the other Greek Isles itineraries we found, and was the main attraction of this cruise. This turned out to be a common reason on the cruise. The ship Nautica is an old Renaissance ship, built in 2001 and updated in 2005. Its 684 passengers have a high percentage of balconies and reasonably sized cabins ý nothing like the suites on the Seven Seas Mariner, but reasonable. The shower was minimal, and my wife missed the marble bath. Our cabin was at the very front and center of the ship, with windows facing forward. We were concerned that it would be too windy to sit out there when at sea, but that was only the case when the 50 knot winds made the entire out-of-doors unpleasant. On the days we cruised through the Dardanelles, the Straights of Messina, the Kotor Fjord and the Venice Lagoon, sitting out there was delightful ý the best seat in the house. We also often had nice views in port, and could watch the crew docking on the deck below us. The bedding was the best we've ever encountered, and the cruise will probably result in our purchase of a new mattress, linens, pillows and duvet from the Oceania web page. Absolutely outstanding. The cabin had more than adequate storage space, a love seat and a little desk. Two 110 volt outlets and two 220 volt outlets on the desk met all our needs, recharging palm pilot and camera batteries simultaneously. There was no minifridge ý that was one deck up, so we had to make do with the ice bucket. Public rooms on the Nautica are elegant, from the Library to the Grand Dining Room to the specialty restaurants and lounges. The dark wood interiors of the Renaissance ships have been polished so they glow. The Nautica Lounge, the entertainment venue, has cocktail table seating, with heavy chairs that had to be rearranged to see the show ý clumsy but workable. The biggest musical review had five entertainers and the band, and the space was more than adequate. The pool deck had more space devoted to chairs than water, and two hot tubs flanking the small pool. It was crowded often, not just on sea days. However, seeing every chair claimed on the sea day, enroute to breakfast, when only three people were in the pool was annoying. The sun deck above had cabanas [for a fee] in what was clearly the best location for watching the world go by. The exercise room was much larger than I remembered on the R7, and I never saw it crowded. The casino also seemed to have grown, with excess slot machines, blackjack tables and a roulette wheel. The two shops specialized in fancy, not the place to buy toothpaste. The grand staircase was mostly useful for formal portraits. The ship is small enough to be easy to navigate. Onboard services Cabin service was provided at our level by a team of two cabin attendants who made up the room every morning and did a complete restoration with turndown service every evening, providing reading materials both times and chocolates on the pillows in the evening. They were both cordial, asking about our day's plans or evening options, discussing the ports, and putting up nicely with my high school Russian (she was Ukrainian and he was Bulgarian, and they both understood the good mornings and good evenings). They were quick to bring more ice and hangars. The front desk was well run and helpful even replacing my laundry token without debate when somebody opened our dryer and didn't push restart. The wait staff was outstanding, from the Maitre d' to the bus boys. Oceania has open seating, so we had service from a many different waiters and they remembered us from previous meals. The hostess overheard my wife telling our tablemates (at a shared table) that it was my birthday, and at dessert I was presented with chocolate cake with candle on a plate that said Happy Birthday David, serenaded by the wait staff. There is seating for two, four, six, eight or ten, and as we were traveling alone, we generally asked to be seated with others at dinner. By the end of the cruise we had many friends, including the waiters. Service in the Grand Dining Room and two specialty restaurants was elegant, with fish knives and forks substituted for the meat ones, Rosenthal china service plates, and napkins placed on your lap regardless of gender. Food was one of the reasons we chose Oceania, and food was provided to meet our needs, desires, expectations and fantasies. Lobster and caviar were served as were a variety of meats, fishes and vegetables to meet any needs. The standard dinner menu had three Spa entrees (meat, fish and chicken), three Jacques Papin specialties, three or four cold appetizers, three of four hot appetizers, two soups, two salads, a pasta and four or five main courses. Nothing I ate was bad. Nothing was even mediocre. Some things were extremely good, like the cold blueberry yogurt soup, the creme brulee, and the multi-grain bread. The scones with clotted cream and raspberry jam at tea were heavenly, the lamb chops at breakfast wonderful, and the bowls of fresh raspberries, blackberries and blueberries served whenever and wherever I asked were great. Presentation was excellent especially for deserts. The meals in the two specialty restaurants were special occasions, with new breads, special appetizers, and outstanding main courses. In the Polo Grill, the steak was good. In Toscana the veal was wonderful, and the chocolate lasagna, as I'd been warned on Cruise Critic, was to die for. The buffet had sushi at dinner, and most of the Grand Dining Room main courses, and a very pleasant back deck to eat on. Breakfast and lunch were less elaborate. Service in the buffet left something to be desired catching the waiter to get water or iced tea. The pool grill was ordinary, but available until 4 handy on days in port. Entertainment was OK -- major production shows are not expected on a small ship, and weren't provided. Shows with four singers were sincere and well performed, but not great. The magician was successful in performing tricks I couldn't explain, the Borsht Belt comedian got me to chuckle, the Barbra Streisand imitation was successful. The enrichment speaker talked about Venice (very useful) and Benny Hill. I didn't play bingo, spent less than five minutes at the art auction, and didn't do the trivia since it wasn't accompanied by tea as it is on RSSC. Destination services were a low point. The tours provided were not attractive, the tour personal were not particularly helpful, and there were a couple of times it was downright annoying. For example, the itinerary said Taormina a medieval town up the slopes of Mt. Etna in Sicily. The ship anchored off Giardini-Naxos, down the hill. Destination services provided two options for independent tourists, a bus at nine, returning at one, or a bus at ten, returning at two, for $40/person. They knew nothing about the public bus where it stopped, when it ran, or what the fare was. We got off the ship and asked, found the bus stop, boarded the bus and went to Taormina for 1.10. There were three buses each hour in each direction comfortable air conditioned buses with reclining seats. In my opinion, if they advertise Taormina as the destination, they should provide a shuttle to Taormina. There was a similar problem in Athens, where the Metro fare was 1.30. The passengers on this trip were very well traveled, and looking for out-of-the-way places. Destination Services didn't help. The ports At one point I turned to my wife, as we entered the walls of Dubrovnik, and said "If you've seen one medieval town, you've seen them all." That's not true, Santorini was very different from Kotor, which didn't even have T-shirts to sell, but they had a lot in common. Port by port: Istanbul -- I worked in Bursa, Turkey five years ago and have been to Istanbul many times, so this visit was mostly to see friends. We stayed at the Sultanahmet Palace Hotel for a few days before the cruise (highly recommended for location, value and charm), and took a taxi to the ship from the hotel at a cost of $6. Taxis from the ship back to Sultanahmet wanted $40, but the tram was only $1. Destination services were no help at all to others who asked. Istanbul is one of the great tourist destinations in the world, and requires at least three or four days to see, but the overnight on the boat was a nice touch. Kusadasi -- This is the port for Ephesus, an impressive Roman archaeological site, but we'd already been, so we looked for other options. The tours focused on Ephesus. We ended up wandering around town. Rhodes -- A medieval pedestrian town. We decided to walk on our own, and headed for the Jewish Quarter; saw the synagogue and the museum. Rhodes had 4,000 Jews before WWII, seven families are left. Mykonos/Delos -- We were plagued with 50 knot winds so out tour of Delos was cancelled. We ended up with the $20 shuttle bus from the port into Mykonos and a fight of the wind to walk into town from the end of the bus route. We were found by an Oceania crew member and hustled back to the ship, as it was so windy they were concerned about damage to the ship in port, and went out to sea and dropped anchor. The latecomers had an exciting tender trip to the ship. The shuttle bus cost was refunded due to the terminated services. Athens -- We took a tour to Corinth. we'd been to Athens and my wife teaches Oedipus and wanted to see where he was from. The Corinth Canal was impressive, but our tour guide would rather have been somewhere else. We got back to the ship and took the Metro to the Acropolis, just to ride the Metro. Santorini -- Another medieval pedestrian town, so we walked on our own, taking the cable car up. The pedestrian path was crowded with donkeys and odorous. We would have liked a tour that included some beach time. Amalfi -- we'd arranged in advance, based on Cruise Critic advice, with barbarapositano@starnet.it to be met at the ship and go to Pompeii. We looked for another couple to join us, and found most of the people we asked had already been to Pompeii, so we went on our own. An overwhelming experience that should have been a tour option -- it's an hour from Amalfi. That night at dinner we met a couple who had asked Destination Services about a tour to Pompeii and instead of being told to contact us, as I'd asked Destination Services to do, they were told "it's too far, you shouldn't go." We stopped for lunch in Ravello on the way back, made it with three hours to spare. Taormina -- As discussed above, we took the public bus up the hill and saw Taormina, another charming medieval pedestrian town. Kotor -- The new kid on the block of charming medieval pedestrian towns -- with a fantastic fjord to reach it. While we were there, they had no power or water, but shops were open anyhow. Dubrovnik -- Fully restored after the 1991 war, with the second oldest synagogue in Europe. Venice -- The trip through the lagoon into Venice was one of the highlights of the trip, enhanced by the information we'd gleaned from the enrichment lectures. We stayed at the Hotel Anastasia after the cruise, an easy walk from the San Marco vaporetto stop. we'd been to Venice before, but were delighted with the tour of La Fenice, the fully restored Venice opera house. Summary Overall, the cruise met our expectations, and often exceeded them. The food was better, the new places we visited were more interesting, the congeniality on the boat, of both passengers and staff was wonderful. We'll definitely cruise Oceania again, but we're also still interested in RSSC offerings. The nickel & diming came to about $700 when we added it up, far less than the difference between Oceania fares and RSSC fares.

Nautica - Eastern Mediterranean

Nautica Cruise Review by Daw6id

Trip Details
My wife and I are in our early sixties. We went on a Royal Caribbean cruise of the Caribbean about 20 years ago, were disappointed with the food, unhappy with our table partners and not impressed with the service or shore excursions. We swore off cruising after that. A friend convinced us to join them on the Renaissance R7 for a cruise from Barcelona to Dover seven years ago, and we were much happier. Then three years ago we went with friends on the RSSC Seven Seas Mariner to Alaska [chosen because it had good food!] and we were hooked. Last year we took the Paul Gauguin around French Polynesia. This year we looked for a RSSC cruise to the Greek Islands. We couldn't find one that met our schedule, and found the Oceania Nautica had an itinerary with everything we were looking for, plus Amalfi, Taormina, Kotor, Dubrovnik and Venice, all for the same price as the RSSC seven day cruise. It was an offer we couldn't refuse.
The Nautica is almost identical to the R7, so we knew we'd like the boat. Oceania's reputation for food was as good as Radisson/Regent's, so we were comfortable there. I was somewhat concerned about the nickel and diming of charging for cokes, bottled water, and wine with dinner and add-on tips, but we decided to try it. As a result, this review will tend to compare Oceania with RSSC. In brief, the cruise met our expectations, exceeded some, and was at least as good a value-for-money as the RSSC. The food was outstanding, the crew excellent and the ship comfortable. The itinerary was a highlight.
The Nautica began the fifteen day cruise in Istanbul, spent a day going through the Dardanelles and down the Aegean Coast to Kusadasi, then Rhodes, Mykonos/Delos, Athens, Santorini, then a day through the Straights of Messina to Amalfi, back to Taormina and across the Adriatic to Kotor in Montenegro, Dubrovnik, then up to Venice. One night was provided on-board in port at both ends. It's an itinerary unlike many of the other Greek Isles itineraries we found, and was the main attraction of this cruise. This turned out to be a common reason on the cruise.
The ship
Nautica is an old Renaissance ship, built in 2001 and updated in 2005. Its 684 passengers have a high percentage of balconies and reasonably sized cabins ý nothing like the suites on the Seven Seas Mariner, but reasonable. The shower was minimal, and my wife missed the marble bath. Our cabin was at the very front and center of the ship, with windows facing forward. We were concerned that it would be too windy to sit out there when at sea, but that was only the case when the 50 knot winds made the entire out-of-doors unpleasant. On the days we cruised through the Dardanelles, the Straights of Messina, the Kotor Fjord and the Venice Lagoon, sitting out there was delightful ý the best seat in the house. We also often had nice views in port, and could watch the crew docking on the deck below us.
The bedding was the best we've ever encountered, and the cruise will probably result in our purchase of a new mattress, linens, pillows and duvet from the Oceania web page. Absolutely outstanding.
The cabin had more than adequate storage space, a love seat and a little desk. Two 110 volt outlets and two 220 volt outlets on the desk met all our needs, recharging palm pilot and camera batteries simultaneously. There was no minifridge ý that was one deck up, so we had to make do with the ice bucket.
Public rooms on the Nautica are elegant, from the Library to the Grand Dining Room to the specialty restaurants and lounges. The dark wood interiors of the Renaissance ships have been polished so they glow. The Nautica Lounge, the entertainment venue, has cocktail table seating, with heavy chairs that had to be rearranged to see the show ý clumsy but workable. The biggest musical review had five entertainers and the band, and the space was more than adequate.
The pool deck had more space devoted to chairs than water, and two hot tubs flanking the small pool. It was crowded often, not just on sea days. However, seeing every chair claimed on the sea day, enroute to breakfast, when only three people were in the pool was annoying. The sun deck above had cabanas [for a fee] in what was clearly the best location for watching the world go by. The exercise room was much larger than I remembered on the R7, and I never saw it crowded.
The casino also seemed to have grown, with excess slot machines, blackjack tables and a roulette wheel. The two shops specialized in fancy, not the place to buy toothpaste. The grand staircase was mostly useful for formal portraits. The ship is small enough to be easy to navigate. Onboard services
Cabin service was provided at our level by a team of two cabin attendants who made up the room every morning and did a complete restoration with turndown service every evening, providing reading materials both times and chocolates on the pillows in the evening. They were both cordial, asking about our day's plans or evening options, discussing the ports, and putting up nicely with my high school Russian (she was Ukrainian and he was Bulgarian, and they both understood the good mornings and good evenings). They were quick to bring more ice and hangars.
The front desk was well run and helpful even replacing my laundry token without debate when somebody opened our dryer and didn't push restart.
The wait staff was outstanding, from the Maitre d' to the bus boys. Oceania has open seating, so we had service from a many different waiters and they remembered us from previous meals. The hostess overheard my wife telling our tablemates (at a shared table) that it was my birthday, and at dessert I was presented with chocolate cake with candle on a plate that said Happy Birthday David, serenaded by the wait staff. There is seating for two, four, six, eight or ten, and as we were traveling alone, we generally asked to be seated with others at dinner. By the end of the cruise we had many friends, including the waiters.
Service in the Grand Dining Room and two specialty restaurants was elegant, with fish knives and forks substituted for the meat ones, Rosenthal china service plates, and napkins placed on your lap regardless of gender.
Food was one of the reasons we chose Oceania, and food was provided to meet our needs, desires, expectations and fantasies. Lobster and caviar were served as were a variety of meats, fishes and vegetables to meet any needs. The standard dinner menu had three Spa entrees (meat, fish and chicken), three Jacques Papin specialties, three or four cold appetizers, three of four hot appetizers, two soups, two salads, a pasta and four or five main courses. Nothing I ate was bad. Nothing was even mediocre. Some things were extremely good, like the cold blueberry yogurt soup, the creme brulee, and the multi-grain bread. The scones with clotted cream and raspberry jam at tea were heavenly, the lamb chops at breakfast wonderful, and the bowls of fresh raspberries, blackberries and blueberries served whenever and wherever I asked were great. Presentation was excellent especially for deserts. The meals in the two specialty restaurants were special occasions, with new breads, special appetizers, and outstanding main courses. In the Polo Grill, the steak was good. In Toscana the veal was wonderful, and the chocolate lasagna, as I'd been warned on Cruise Critic, was to die for. The buffet had sushi at dinner, and most of the Grand Dining Room main courses, and a very pleasant back deck to eat on. Breakfast and lunch were less elaborate. Service in the buffet left something to be desired catching the waiter to get water or iced tea. The pool grill was ordinary, but available until 4 handy on days in port.
Entertainment was OK -- major production shows are not expected on a small ship, and weren't provided. Shows with four singers were sincere and well performed, but not great. The magician was successful in performing tricks I couldn't explain, the Borsht Belt comedian got me to chuckle, the Barbra Streisand imitation was successful. The enrichment speaker talked about Venice (very useful) and Benny Hill. I didn't play bingo, spent less than five minutes at the art auction, and didn't do the trivia since it wasn't accompanied by tea as it is on RSSC.
Destination services were a low point. The tours provided were not attractive, the tour personal were not particularly helpful, and there were a couple of times it was downright annoying. For example, the itinerary said Taormina a medieval town up the slopes of Mt. Etna in Sicily. The ship anchored off Giardini-Naxos, down the hill. Destination services provided two options for independent tourists, a bus at nine, returning at one, or a bus at ten, returning at two, for $40/person. They knew nothing about the public bus where it stopped, when it ran, or what the fare was. We got off the ship and asked, found the bus stop, boarded the bus and went to Taormina for 1.10. There were three buses each hour in each direction comfortable air conditioned buses with reclining seats. In my opinion, if they advertise Taormina as the destination, they should provide a shuttle to Taormina. There was a similar problem in Athens, where the Metro fare was 1.30. The passengers on this trip were very well traveled, and looking for out-of-the-way places. Destination Services didn't help. The ports
At one point I turned to my wife, as we entered the walls of Dubrovnik, and said "If you've seen one medieval town, you've seen them all." That's not true, Santorini was very different from Kotor, which didn't even have T-shirts to sell, but they had a lot in common.
Port by port:
Istanbul -- I worked in Bursa, Turkey five years ago and have been to Istanbul many times, so this visit was mostly to see friends. We stayed at the Sultanahmet Palace Hotel for a few days before the cruise (highly recommended for location, value and charm), and took a taxi to the ship from the hotel at a cost of $6. Taxis from the ship back to Sultanahmet wanted $40, but the tram was only $1. Destination services were no help at all to others who asked. Istanbul is one of the great tourist destinations in the world, and requires at least three or four days to see, but the overnight on the boat was a nice touch.
Kusadasi -- This is the port for Ephesus, an impressive Roman archaeological site, but we'd already been, so we looked for other options. The tours focused on Ephesus. We ended up wandering around town.
Rhodes -- A medieval pedestrian town. We decided to walk on our own, and headed for the Jewish Quarter; saw the synagogue and the museum. Rhodes had 4,000 Jews before WWII, seven families are left.
Mykonos/Delos -- We were plagued with 50 knot winds so out tour of Delos was cancelled. We ended up with the $20 shuttle bus from the port into Mykonos and a fight of the wind to walk into town from the end of the bus route. We were found by an Oceania crew member and hustled back to the ship, as it was so windy they were concerned about damage to the ship in port, and went out to sea and dropped anchor. The latecomers had an exciting tender trip to the ship. The shuttle bus cost was refunded due to the terminated services.
Athens -- We took a tour to Corinth. we'd been to Athens and my wife teaches Oedipus and wanted to see where he was from. The Corinth Canal was impressive, but our tour guide would rather have been somewhere else. We got back to the ship and took the Metro to the Acropolis, just to ride the Metro.
Santorini -- Another medieval pedestrian town, so we walked on our own, taking the cable car up. The pedestrian path was crowded with donkeys and odorous. We would have liked a tour that included some beach time.
Amalfi -- we'd arranged in advance, based on Cruise Critic advice, with barbarapositano@starnet.it to be met at the ship and go to Pompeii. We looked for another couple to join us, and found most of the people we asked had already been to Pompeii, so we went on our own. An overwhelming experience that should have been a tour option -- it's an hour from Amalfi. That night at dinner we met a couple who had asked Destination Services about a tour to Pompeii and instead of being told to contact us, as I'd asked Destination Services to do, they were told "it's too far, you shouldn't go." We stopped for lunch in Ravello on the way back, made it with three hours to spare.
Taormina -- As discussed above, we took the public bus up the hill and saw Taormina, another charming medieval pedestrian town.
Kotor -- The new kid on the block of charming medieval pedestrian towns -- with a fantastic fjord to reach it. While we were there, they had no power or water, but shops were open anyhow.
Dubrovnik -- Fully restored after the 1991 war, with the second oldest synagogue in Europe.
Venice -- The trip through the lagoon into Venice was one of the highlights of the trip, enhanced by the information we'd gleaned from the enrichment lectures. We stayed at the Hotel Anastasia after the cruise, an easy walk from the San Marco vaporetto stop. we'd been to Venice before, but were delighted with the tour of La Fenice, the fully restored Venice opera house.
Summary
Overall, the cruise met our expectations, and often exceeded them. The food was better, the new places we visited were more interesting, the congeniality on the boat, of both passengers and staff was wonderful. We'll definitely cruise Oceania again, but we're also still interested in RSSC offerings. The nickel & diming came to about $700 when we added it up, far less than the difference between Oceania fares and RSSC fares.
Daw6id’s Full Rating Summary
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