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13 Night Panama Canal & Central America Cruise from Miami

13 Night Panama Canal & Central America Cruise from Miami

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Seabourn Quest (Photo: Seabourn Cruises)
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Itinerary

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  • Day 1
    Miami
  • Day 2
    Cruising
  • Day 3
    Cruising
  • Day 4
    Cruising
  • Day 5
    Panama Canal (Cruising)
  • Day 6
    Fuerte Amador (Balboa)
  • Day 7
    Cruising
  • Day 8
    Manta
  • Day 9
    Manta
  • Day 10
    Machala
  • Day 11
    Cruising
  • Day 12
    Salaverry (Trujillo)
  • Day 13
    Lima
  • Day 14
    Lima

Seabourn Quest

Seabourn Quest - Seabourn Cruise Line

Pros

Inclusive fares, gourmet dining, spacious cabins, incredible itineraries

Cons

Occasional service hiccups are puzzling on a ship of this caliber

Bottom Line

If you want Champagne and caviar with your world travels, check out Quest


Cruise Reviews

There is much to like about Seabourn's fall foliage cruise provided you don't encounter a hurricane (Dorian) and have to forego Prince Edward Island and opt instead for 2 nights in St. John New Brunswick, an unscheduled port ... Read More
There is much to like about Seabourn's fall foliage cruise provided you don't encounter a hurricane (Dorian) and have to forego Prince Edward Island and opt instead for 2 nights in St. John New Brunswick, an unscheduled port where it rained sideways. The captain was cautious, and when we read about the power outages in PEI and the hurricane-related problems in Halifax, we felt good about Seabourn. Highlights for us include: * Thomas Keller Grill (restaurant) * Earth and Ocean (restaurant) * Decent and copious amounts of complimentary wine at each meal * Top-shelf liquor, also complimentary, with a generous pour * Great service from staff, especially waiters and bartenders * Availability of early morning coffee, espresso and snacks (6:15 am!) Problematic issues for us include: * Deck 4 'suite' #433 - very close to service entrances and elevators with no balcony. Seabourn should forego the claustrophobic rooms on Deck 4 and re-purpose the space (only 30 rooms +/-) * Excursions were outrageously expensive. Full Stop. * Saguenay Fjords - advertised as the best in North America, which sounded terrific, were only visible at night. Seriously! The ship's lecture described the magnificence of the fjords, but then pointed out that it was too bad we wouldn't see them because it would be nighttime. * Cap Aux Meules - we're not sure why the ship stopped here unless they needed to restock. Very little to do and quite barren. * Evening dining doesn't begin until 7pm, offering no options but room service for guests who like to eat earlier and avoid going to bed with full tummies * And lastly, we thought the food (other than the Thomas Keller Grill and Earth and Ocean) was inconsitent. Fortunately there was a good salad bar and plenty of smoke salmon. We would urge Seabourn to adopt a Viking feature and offer sushi and sashimi at dinner. Read Less
Sail Date September 2019
We chose this cruise as a way to visit both Greenland and Nunavut. With our tickets, two weeks before departure, the itinerary stated that we would not be able to go ashore at any of the three stops in Nunavut. We did not look at the ... Read More
We chose this cruise as a way to visit both Greenland and Nunavut. With our tickets, two weeks before departure, the itinerary stated that we would not be able to go ashore at any of the three stops in Nunavut. We did not look at the itinerary before boarding the ship - we thought we knew where we were going and had of course paid in full. We anchored in the harbour of Iqaliut for customs clearance. We were not alone in thinking we were visiting Iqaliut, only those that had gone through the itinerary issued with the tickets actually had any idea we would not be getting off the ship. We spent 8 days in a row on the ship - a total of 12 days at sea on a 24 day cruise. We would never have taken this cruise had we known it was not stopping in Nunavut. It was billed as an "adventure" cruise, but it felt like a trip to nowhere. We felt we had been totally misled by the line, and even though we have been on quite a number of cruises with the line, we would not have any confidence in the itinerary again. Excursions - The expensive trips by zodiac are a complete waste of money - we spent 20 minutes circling a rusted hull of a ship in Paamiut for no apparent reason; a trip in dense fog to see a rock called Lady Franklin Island where we lost one of the zodiacs and then, having found the lost zodiac, had to be guided back to the ship by the Bridge as the fog was so thick. Staff - The only reason for giving this cruise any rating is that the staff are, as has always been the case, just outstanding. They are friendly, make the effort to learn your name, and are always helping to make your time on board as comfortable as possible. Food - not as good as it used to be, but then they were clearly struggling with lack of supplies as we were at sea for so long. Lobsters were clearly off the menu and perhaps one of the cost-cutting exercises. The ship does offer a Lactose and Gluten free options, at least in the Colonnade Restaurant, for lunch. Room service is excellent and you can choose from the main restaurant menu during opening hours. Overall this is a nice ship to sail on, but as we only endure sea days in order to reach places we would find complicated to get to by air, this cruise was dreadfully disappointing and we feel completely misled by Seabourn as to the intended itinerary. I should add that none of the itinerary changes were due to weather conditions. Read Less
Sail Date August 2019
Our first Seabourn Cruise. We were on board for 45 days, Dover to Montreal via Scotland, Iceland, Greenland, Labrador. The Viking historical highlights were the Hvalsey church in Greenland and the Anse aux Meadows in Newfoundland. Sadly, ... Read More
Our first Seabourn Cruise. We were on board for 45 days, Dover to Montreal via Scotland, Iceland, Greenland, Labrador. The Viking historical highlights were the Hvalsey church in Greenland and the Anse aux Meadows in Newfoundland. Sadly, the St. Kilda landing was scrubbed due to inclement weather. The scenic highlights were the fjords and glaciers of Prince Christian Sound, and the cultural highlights were Isle of Man, Reykjavik, and Nuuk (Greenland). Good itinerary, but we saw other, more nimble ships making the same calls (notably Ponant and Scenic), so there are alternatives to Seabourn. We were in cabin 826 (they call it a "suite") which is roomy with a generous balcony, but with what we consider design flaws. The TV is poorly positioned for comfortable viewing, the lighting for the table is not optimal, the closet is cramped. The twin sinks in the head are nice, but with a good shower, the bathtub is unnecessary, and uses space better allocated to the closet (the old "R" vessels have dressing room/closets which we much prefer). The vanity is well done. We were surprised that no binoculars were provided (as we had on Silversea), this on a cruise where icebergs, whales, polar bears, sea birds, and calving glaciers are spotted and watched. The common spaces are elegant and roomy. The six elevators run like a charm and one hardly ever waits for a ride, even when the crowd exits the shows or lectures. Tender shuttles, quay landings, and shore excursions were run very smoothly. The food is very elaborate, excessively so in our opinion. Lots of choices, but all of the gourmet "nouvelle" style, with rich sauces and elegantly presented. Plain dishes can be ordered from room service or at the patio restaurant, the latter being an uncomfortable place in the northern latitudes. Staff is extraordinarily attentive - room service comes very promptly, table service will see your plate whisked away as you put down your fork, your wine glass refilled while still two-thirds full. Our impression is that the obsession with delivering over-the-top service results in a somewhat tense and forced amiability on the part of the wait staff. The staff is drawn from a very diverse set of nationalities, a departure from the more cohesive crews of filipino or indonesian origin on other cruise lines, which we have found to be more relaxed and genuinely warm. The captain made daily detailed announcements about weather outlook and sailing status, and the attention to navigation and safety was very thorough. We were able to witness the bridge protocols on a port departure, and everything was conducted very carefully and by the book. Quiet competence and superb attention to safety. There is a striking schizophrenic aspect to the QUEST, originally designed for sailing warm waters and subsequently modified for high-latitude cruising: it is a deluxe ship trying to masquerade as a quasi-expedition platform. Of the 45-day cruise, no more than three of four were of shirtsleeve temperature with clear skies, yet every day the lounges around the pool were lined up with fresh towels (and thus forcing passengers to walk on a delaminating portion of the teak deck, rahter than on a safer path!). The outdoor restaurant provides infrared heatlamps and blankets for each table. The "expedition" complement of ten or twelve "zodiacs" is clearly insufficient to take more than a quarter of the passengers off at any one time. There is an extra charge of $150 per hour per person for such excursions, again not much in keeping with the expedition structure we have experienced elsewhere. A week or ten days, rather than 45 days, might have worked better for us on this Seabourn cruise. We'll likely choose to go with one of our other favorites (Regent Seven Seas, Silversea, Ponant, Windstar) on our next cruise . Read Less
Sail Date July 2019
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