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21 Night South America Cruise from Buenos Aires

21 Night South America Cruise from Buenos Aires

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Seabourn Quest (Photo: Seabourn Cruises)
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Itinerary

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  • Day 1
    Buenos Aires
  • Day 2
    Buenos Aires
  • Day 3
    Punta del Este
  • Day 4
    Montevideo
  • Day 5
    Cruising
  • Day 6
    Cruising
  • Day 7
    Ilhabela
  • Day 8
    Rio de Janeiro
  • Day 9
    Rio de Janeiro
  • Day 10
    Buzios
  • Day 11
    Cruising
  • Day 12
    Cruising
  • Day 13
    Recife
  • Day 14
    Natal
  • Day 15
    Cruising
  • Day 16
    Cruising
  • Day 17
    Cruising
  • Day 18
    Amazon River (Cruising)
  • Day 19
    Santarem
  • Day 20
    Amazon River (Cruising)
  • Day 21
    Manaus
  • Day 22
    Manaus

Seabourn Quest

Seabourn Quest - Seabourn Cruise Line

Pros

Inclusive fares, gourmet dining, spacious cabins, incredible itineraries

Cons

Occasional service hiccups are puzzling on a ship of this caliber

Bottom Line

If you want Champagne and caviar with your world travels, check out Quest


Cruise Reviews

3 Helpful Votes
Sail Date: July 2019
Our first Seabourn Cruise. We were on board for 45 days, Dover to Montreal via Scotland, Iceland, Greenland, Labrador. The Viking historical highlights were the Hvalsey church in Greenland and the Anse aux Meadows in Newfoundland. Sadly, ... Read More
Our first Seabourn Cruise. We were on board for 45 days, Dover to Montreal via Scotland, Iceland, Greenland, Labrador. The Viking historical highlights were the Hvalsey church in Greenland and the Anse aux Meadows in Newfoundland. Sadly, the St. Kilda landing was scrubbed due to inclement weather. The scenic highlights were the fjords and glaciers of Prince Christian Sound, and the cultural highlights were Isle of Man, Reykjavik, and Nuuk (Greenland). Good itinerary, but we saw other, more nimble ships making the same calls (notably Ponant and Scenic), so there are alternatives to Seabourn. We were in cabin 826 (they call it a "suite") which is roomy with a generous balcony, but with what we consider design flaws. The TV is poorly positioned for comfortable viewing, the lighting for the table is not optimal, the closet is cramped. The twin sinks in the head are nice, but with a good shower, the bathtub is unnecessary, and uses space better allocated to the closet (the old "R" vessels have dressing room/closets which we much prefer). The vanity is well done. We were surprised that no binoculars were provided (as we had on Silversea), this on a cruise where icebergs, whales, polar bears, sea birds, and calving glaciers are spotted and watched. The common spaces are elegant and roomy. The six elevators run like a charm and one hardly ever waits for a ride, even when the crowd exits the shows or lectures. Tender shuttles, quay landings, and shore excursions were run very smoothly. The food is very elaborate, excessively so in our opinion. Lots of choices, but all of the gourmet "nouvelle" style, with rich sauces and elegantly presented. Plain dishes can be ordered from room service or at the patio restaurant, the latter being an uncomfortable place in the northern latitudes. Staff is extraordinarily attentive - room service comes very promptly, table service will see your plate whisked away as you put down your fork, your wine glass refilled while still two-thirds full. Our impression is that the obsession with delivering over-the-top service results in a somewhat tense and forced amiability on the part of the wait staff. The staff is drawn from a very diverse set of nationalities, a departure from the more cohesive crews of filipino or indonesian origin on other cruise lines, which we have found to be more relaxed and genuinely warm. The captain made daily detailed announcements about weather outlook and sailing status, and the attention to navigation and safety was very thorough. We were able to witness the bridge protocols on a port departure, and everything was conducted very carefully and by the book. Quiet competence and superb attention to safety. There is a striking schizophrenic aspect to the QUEST, originally designed for sailing warm waters and subsequently modified for high-latitude cruising: it is a deluxe ship trying to masquerade as a quasi-expedition platform. Of the 45-day cruise, no more than three of four were of shirtsleeve temperature with clear skies, yet every day the lounges around the pool were lined up with fresh towels (and thus forcing passengers to walk on a delaminating portion of the teak deck, rahter than on a safer path!). The outdoor restaurant provides infrared heatlamps and blankets for each table. The "expedition" complement of ten or twelve "zodiacs" is clearly insufficient to take more than a quarter of the passengers off at any one time. There is an extra charge of $150 per hour per person for such excursions, again not much in keeping with the expedition structure we have experienced elsewhere. A week or ten days, rather than 45 days, might have worked better for us on this Seabourn cruise. We'll likely choose to go with one of our other favorites (Regent Seven Seas, Silversea, Ponant, Windstar) on our next cruise . Read Less
1 Helpful Vote
Sail Date: July 2019
Great itinerary. Lots of stops in Ireland. One really gets a feel for the country and island. Northern Ireland was also very interesting. Most of the excursions were satisfactory but tame. We did some trips on our own (such as to Bushmills ... Read More
Great itinerary. Lots of stops in Ireland. One really gets a feel for the country and island. Northern Ireland was also very interesting. Most of the excursions were satisfactory but tame. We did some trips on our own (such as to Bushmills Irish Whiskey Distillery and Antrim Coast), Limerick, and other places where we wanted to spend more time. But many of the ship excursions were half day and we felt there would not be enough time at the locations to really experience them. We felt the dining experience was overly formal for our tastes- not including the formal nights which we did not go to. There was only sit down service available in all the dining venues. Staff was very attentive and helpful and the food was good. But no buffet was available. As a result dining took 2-2 1/2 hours each night. The ship also changed the time of departure in several ports which upset our plans when we were doing activities on our own. No explanation was given for such changes. The cruise director had no interest in coordinating what passengers could do on their own with local services and transportation. For example, in Foynes, Ireland, the last shuttle bus from town to the ship was scheduled to leave before the local bus from Limerick to Foynes would arrive in Foynes even though the ship would still be in port. That information could have easily been ascertained and the shuttle bus coordinated with the local bus times from Limerick to Foynes. When this lack of information was pointed out to him he was disinterested. The cabin was generous in dimensions, had good storage space, a comfortable bed and in general, nice appointments. However, the tv was a small tv that fit inside a cabinet with doors that rolled out (circa 1980). I would have expected a big screen tv mounted on the wall, maybe 2 tvs. The on demand selection was good. Read Less
7 Helpful Votes
Sail Date: July 2019
We are long time Seabourn cruisers recently off a 16 day cruise on Quest. Last year on an 18 day trip on Ovation we noticed many changes, not for the good. This trip, it’s clear the product has sunk far below what it once was. ... Read More
We are long time Seabourn cruisers recently off a 16 day cruise on Quest. Last year on an 18 day trip on Ovation we noticed many changes, not for the good. This trip, it’s clear the product has sunk far below what it once was. 1. Dinner Service in the Restaurant/Colonnade. Three dinners where we casually appeared between 7:30 and 8:30. Result: At least a half hour between courses. Water and wine filled once and never again. This situation was a topic of discussion around the ship and some had figured out that if you go right when they open, you will have decent service. So for all the next dinners we raced to get in line before 7 so that we could have a decent dinner. Many times the line at 6:50 snaked to the back of the ship. 2. Service in the Observation Bar. This was a cold trip so the Sky Bar and Patio Bar were useless. The Observation Bar was the only bar open before 6:30 P.M. and since we had to be in line before 7 P.M. to get a decent dinner, you had to be in the Observation Bar for a pre-dinner drink. It was packed. People would get there at 5:30 and put clothing on seats. At 6:15 there would be massive groups circling for a seat. And getting a refill or second drink - forget it. We, and many others, asked for the Club to open early. It never did. So now if you wanted to be at the Observation Bar you had to rush to get up there by 5:30/5:45 or you weren’t getting in. Now we are rushing to get a drink and rushing to get dinner 3. Service in Housekeeping. Hand towels missing, called Guest Services, called Housekeeping, three days later hand towels. Same with bath towels and a bath mat on different occasions. One night came back from a show, took a shower and did not notice until exiting the shower – no bath towels. Loved drying my long hair with a hand towel. They have taken away bottled water in the room and now have a jug. But that only works when you have glasses which we had only twice. 4. I could go on including waiting for tables at breakfast because there were no clean ones. The major topic everywhere in the ship was complaints and horror stories about dinners and shore excursions and such. That old thing about “have dinner when you want with whom you want” is a joke. Our whole schedule was about getting to the Bar and one of the Restaurants when they opened so we could get a seat. Ugly. They have removed the good champagne and replaced it with a very poor version. The Patio Grill buffet at lunch is half what it was. The great cranberry nut cookies they used to have on all ships are no more because “cranberries are too expensive”. This is not a luxury experience anymore. 5. We spoke to many staff about what had happened and the answer was they have gone from the former ratio of 2 guests to one staff to three guests to one staff (150 crew on Quest versus the former 225). It shows. I can’t imagine what would get us, long time Seabourn cruisers, back on board. Sorry to see Seabourn become what they have become. Read Less
View All Seabourn Quest Reviews
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