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Blue Lagoon Cruises

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Who goes on Blue Lagoon cruise ships?

Blue Lagoon attracts a diverse passenger base, from honeymooners to active seniors. The majority hail from nearby Australia and New Zealand, followed by cruisers from the U.S., U.K. and Japan.

Children are allowed onboard only during family cruises, which depart during certain school holiday periods in the Southern Hemisphere.

Do I have to dress up on a Blue Lagoon cruise?

No. Dress is unquestionably casual. Pack your swimsuit, shorts, T-shirts, sunglasses, hat and flip-flops as well as a rash vest or similar outfit for snorkeling. Modest clothing is recommended for visits to the local villages, which means no tank tops, hats or swimsuits. At dinnertime, the emphasis is on informal resort wear. Take along a light jacket or sweater for cooler evenings.

Is everything free on Blue Lagoon cruises?

No, but all meals and shore excursions are included (except scuba diving, which does carry a fee). Beverages, such as filtered water, juices, tea and coffee, are also included.

Alcoholic drinks and massages incur extra charges, and in lieu of paying gratuity, there's an automatic donation to the line's chosen charity, Vinaka Fiji.

What are Blue Lagoon’s most popular activities?

With only four hours per day allotted to sailing, there's plenty of time for water fun and exploring the small islands the ship visits, with options that might include kayaking, fishing and bush walking. Only the most adventurous cruisers pick the 6 a.m. swims with the Fijian crew; most other passengers wait until after breakfast to hit the water. Among the more popular shore experiences are visiting a village school and taking part in the ancient yaqona (kava) ceremony, as well as seeing traditional songs and dances. A highlight of each trip is the magiti, a Fijian feast of pork, chicken, fish and vegetables wrapped in palm leaves and cooked in a pit called a lovo onshore.

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  • Lowest pricing is based on our 3rd party pricing supplier and valid as of November 14th, 2019.