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Best Cruise Ship Beds

The Owner's Suite on Riviera (Photo: Cruise Critic)
The Owner's Suite on Riviera (Photo: Cruise Critic)

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Cruise ships offer an exceptionally restful night's sleep, and it's not just the waves rocking you back and forth that does it. Many cruise lines have chosen to make a significant investment in the mattresses and bedding found in their cruise ship cabins. From pillow menus and branded partnerships to exclusive mattress materials, cruise lines take sleep seriously.

If you want an incredible night's sleep on your vacation -- and the inside scoop on how to bring cruise-style slumber into your own home -- read on to discover which cruise ship beds are the best at sea.


Updated March 12, 2020

Princess Cruises' Princess Luxury Bed

Princess enlisted the help of Dr. Michael Breus, a board-certified sleep expert, and HGTV design personality Candice Olson to create the ultimate bed to catch the eye and comfort the body. From the pillows to the box spring, each of the 10 components of these beds was carefully constructed for maximum comfort. Plus, the fibers used are organic and sustainable, and the foam is naturally derived. 

You can order your own bed using Princess Cruises' Princess Luxury Bed microsite. (Some Cruise Critic editors have actually done this!) In addition to selling its signature mattress, Princess also offers a variety of bedding and towels.


Matermoll Beds on Oceania and Regent Seven Seas Cruises

Sister companies Oceania and Regent both use the Italian designer Matermoll for their bedding. Mattresses are an ergonomically designed feat of engineering with 3,000 coils and an air suspension system so you never feel overheated. Materials include eucalyptus in the pillow top. Both lines also sell 1,000-thread-count, Egyptian cotton sheets by Emmebiesse and pillows made from gel, feathers or foam (four types for Oceania and six for Regent).

You can purchase Oceania Cruises' Tranquility Bed or Regent Seven Seas Cruises' Elite Slumber Bed Collection online at each line's dedicated bedding website.


Crystal Cruises' Suite Bedding

Crystal puts its emphasis on luxurious yet hypoallergenic bedding. Made in the U.S., its Suite Mattresses are made from Talalay latex, which is naturally hypoallergenic and resistant to mold, mildew and dust mites; they are body-contouring and sleep cooler than regular foam mattresses. The mattresses feature a quilted, plush top over a two-inch layer of Talalay latex, which rests on a five-inch medium-firm soy-based foam core.

Crystal's Suite Pillows are also foam and made of Talalay latex, inside a Trilobal microfiber fabric cover. Head to the Exclusively Crystal website to purchase your own allergy-free sleep system.


Carnival Cruise Line's Comfort Bed

Manufactured in Europe exclusively for Carnival, the Comfort Bed includes custom pillows, duvets and sheets that are hypoallergenic and made with ring-spun satin. While there's nothing particularly fancy about these beds, we're including them here because given the value of a Carnival cruise, the beds don't feel at all budget.

Carnival's mattresses aren't sold online, but you can customize your bed at home with the line's blankets and pillows to feel just like you're back in your cozy cabin. Grab your bedding on the Carnival Comfort Collection microsite.


Savoir Beds on Various Cruise Lines

Luxury British bed-maker Savoir has designed bespoke mattresses for select suites on Silversea and Regent Seven Seas Cruises' ships, as well as beds for river cruise line Uniworld. Savoir, which started out making beds for The Savoy, London's first high-end hotel, uses top-quality natural materials, like lamb's wool and cashmere, and hand tufts each mattress to ensure the most exact measure of customization. For example, Regent's custom Savoir mattress, found only in the master bedroom of the Seven Seas Explorer's Regent Suite, is made from horse hair and costs as much as some people's house: nearly $150,000.

Procure your own deluxe mattress by visiting the Savoir Beds website

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