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Packing For Your Next Cruise (Photo: sebra/Shutterstock)
Packing For Your Next Cruise (Photo: sebra/Shutterstock)

What Not to Forget On a Cruise: 10 Things to Remember to Pack

We all know that sinking feeling when you realize you've left something important behind, whether it's your phone in the car or your wallet at the restaurant you just left. That feeling is much worse when you're on a cruise and discover that you've forgotten something at home. While not every "oops" will upend your cruise, some will, while others can prove to be enough of headache to put a dent in an otherwise great vacation. From A to Z, we list a few critical things not to forget the next time you cruise.

Updated April 12, 2019

1. Adapter

If you're traveling outside of the North American and Caribbean region and will be spending any time at a hotel, you'll need to bring a power adapter with you. It's an easy item to forget as most cruise ships these days offer both North American and European plug sockets, but hotels do not. We recommend getting an all-in-one world adapter that you just leave in your suitcase all the time; that way you'll always have it when you need it. (Plus, you can use it on your cruise ship to make use of an additional outlet.)

2. Band-Aids

Unless you're on a warm-weather cruise and plan on plonking yourself down poolside all day or at the beach in every port, you'll probably be doing a lot more walking than you expect. Even your most broken-in shoes might start to feel a little rough in destinations like Alaska and Europe where glacier hikes or walking tours are standard fare. Be prepared for the inevitable blister or two with Band-Aids at hand, in whatever bag you carry with you off the ship and some spare ones onboard.

3. Chargers

Don't waste half a port day chasing down a laptop charger like one Cruise Critic senior editor was forced to do after switching laptop bags and forgetting to move the charger to the new bag. If you're bringing anything that needs to be charged, make sure to double-check you've got the charger for it. There are lots of cruise destinations where getting a replacement charger could be near to impossible. You do not want to be stuck in a picture-perfect setting with no way to take a picture! Keep cords organized with an electronics gear bag.

4. Emergency contact list

Sure, we've all got our contact numbers stored in our cell phones these days, but what if someone else needs to make a call on your behalf and your phone requires a PIN or thumbprint? Or what if the phone is missing or the battery is dead? Having a hard copy of all your emergency contacts in your wallet or stored in your in-cabin safe could turn out to be a lifesaver.

5. ID

Sadly, we've read horror stories of people showing up to cruise ports without their passports, birth certificates or required visas and getting turned away. If it's the last thing you do before you walk out your door, always check to make sure you've got all the identification and paperwork that is required for every step of your trip.

Whether its passports, birth certificates (only an option on closed loop cruise sailings out of a U.S. port) or visas for countries you'll be visiting, forgetting any one of these could leave you stranded while your cruise ship sails away. For an extra layer of security, keep copies of all of these (as well as your travel insurance policy) in a separate location from the originals. (We like this travel document organizer.)

6. Medications

Other than a handful of over-the-counter remedies (cold pills, pain relievers and seasickness treatments) sold at inflated prices, cruise ships carry only a limited supply of prescription medications, and these are given out only in emergencies. If you take any kind of medicine on a daily basis, be it prescription, vitamin or something else, it's imperative you bring enough with you to last your entire cruise -- and even a few days longer just in case some type of travel delay prevents you from getting home on time.

Even though most cruise ships do carry pills for seasickness prevention either in the sundries shop or in the medical center, if you're prone to seasickness you shouldn't forget to bring your own supply as well. Store it all in a sleek pill organizer that doesn't scream "senior."

7. Sweater

Even on warm-weather cruises you're likely to run into unexpected chilly air, particularly in public areas of your cruise ship where the A/C is often set to "blast." Plus, you never known when Mexico or the Caribbean will be hit by a cold spell. Forgetting to bring a pullover, cardigan, sweatshirt or sweater could result in spending extra money on an over-priced piece of clothing you never wear again.

8. Snack bars/packs

Going to be off your cruise ship for an entire day? Bussing it out to a remote shore expedition locale where there might not be any convenience stores? It's never a bad idea to have a snack with you when getting off the ship as you don't always know if you'll be able to get something to eat if you need it. (This is especially essentially if you've got kids in tow or have issues with low blood sugar.)

But taking food off a cruise ship is always a no-no unless it's a prepackaged, sealed snack bar or snack pack. Since these types of snack foods are rarely sold on cruise ships, don't forget to throw a handful into your luggage when packing.

9. Tampons & pads

Ladies, listen up! Don't forget to bring your preferred brand of tampons and pads when you cruise. Whether you're due for your period or not, it's always a good idea to have a stash on hand, particularly if your cruise sailing includes lots of sea days or visits exotic locations where sanitary products might not be readily available. Try this adorable and whimsical tampon travel bag to store them.

10. Ziploc bags

You can use Ziploc bags in a variety of sizes for practically anything, from an impromptu protector for your phone from the sand and water if you're hanging on the beach to something to throw your wet bathing suit into if you've got the time to change after snorkeling. They're also great if you want to grab some food from the buffet for a late-night snack in your room or for storing a sandwich if you don't want to give up your prime lounger by the pool at lunch time.


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Cruise Critic makes no endorsements, representations or warranties with respect to the products, organizations or websites referenced in the above article, nor is any warranty created or extended by providing such information, and Cruise Critic shall not be liable for any damages arising therefrom. The advice and strategies contained herein may not be suitable for every situation.

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