1. Home
  2. Cruise Styles
  3. River Cruises
  4. 8 Fairytale Towns to Visit by River Cruise

8 Fairytale Towns to Visit by River Cruise

  • You don't need a fairy godmother to see places that look like they belong in a storybook. A European river cruise offers the opportunity to visit some of the world's most fabled villages, where whimsical buildings, otherworldly scenery and castles abound.

    Wish upon a star to visit these eight fairytale towns on a river cruise.

    Photo: littlewormy/Shutterstock.com

  • 1

    Colmar, France

    Candy-colored houses, flower-lined canals and a plethora of intimate shops, cafes and bakeries make Colmar one of the most fairytale-like towns in Europe. A melting pot of French and German influences, the Alsatian village is not only a feast for the eyes but also the taste buds -- Muenster cheese and Gewurztraminer wine, anyone? Day trips to Colmar are offered on a number of river cruise lines' Rhine River itineraries.

    Photo: Sergey Dzyuba/Shutterstock.com

  • 2

    Cesky Krumlov, Czech Republic

    Perched in the hills of the southern Czech Republic, Cesky Krumlov casts love spells on visitors with its artsy castle and gardens, riverside bars and cafes, and timeless charm. Climb the castle's bell tower for sprawling views of the town, or stick to the streets for a closer look at its well-preserved Renaissance, Gothic and Baroque architecture, which dates back as early as the 13th century. Look for shore excursions to Cesky Krumlov from Passau, Germany, and Linz, Austria, on Danube River cruises.

    Photo: Veronika Galkina/Shutterstock.com

  • 3

    Bruges, Belgium

    Beginning or ending your river cruise in Amsterdam? Consider extending your stay with a trip to Bruges (day trips are often offered on ocean cruises, too). The medieval city, which is less than a three-hour trek from the Netherlands capital, earns its "Venice of the North" nickname from canals that intertwine with old stone buildings, whitewashed cottages and bustling squares (most notably, the Markt). The best way to explore Bruges is to get lost in its cobblestone streets -- just make sure you eventually make your way to a pub and chocolate shop.

    Photo: MarinaDa/Shutterstock.com

  • 4

    Sintra, Portugal

    Wandering through Sintra's Old Town, mystical forest and Quinta da Regaleira palace -- where hidden passages comingle with grottoes -- can make anyone feel like a fairytale princess or prince. The hilltop village once inhabited by the Portuguese Royal Family is a must-visit for anyone on a Duoro River cruise. Although the river runs north through Porto, pre- and post-cruise stays in Lisbon (roughly 30 minutes from Sintra) are commonly offered by the lines; some even include guided tours.

    Photo: INTERPIXELS/Shutterstock.com

  • 5

    Fontaine-de-Vaucluse, France

    You're in luck if your Rhone River cruise offers a shore excursion to Fontaine-de-Vaucluse. Tucked away in the South of France, this medieval hamlet spellbinds visitors with an emerald green stream, old water wheel and charming, tree-lined streets dotted with pastel-colored shops and cafes. Active types also will love the town's blissfully unspoiled surroundings, which make for excellent kayaking, canoeing and hiking. Don't see Fointaine-de-Vaucluse on your itinerary? No worries. The town is still easily accessible on your own; it's only 45 minutes from Avignon, a popular starting/ending point for Rhone River cruises.

    Photo: Olgysha/Shutterstock.com

  • 6

    Giethoorn, Netherlands

    There's no better way to relish Giethoorn's storybook scenery than from its tranquil canals. Less than two hours from Amsterdam, the Dutch village epitomizes the simple life -- cars are off limits, and "whisper boats" are the primary means of transportation. Hop on a ride and mosey past thatched-roof cottages and alfresco cafes, where you can dock for a quick lunch, or stick to walking or biking along the waterside footpaths.

    Photo: Marc Venema/Shutterstock.com

  • 7

    Lucerne, Switzerland

    Lucerne offers a little bit of everything people love about Switzerland -- breathtaking scenery, chocolatiers and sumptuous cheese. Nestled on a crystal clear lake in the mountains, the "Gateway to Central Switzerland" woos visitors with its ancient buildings and bridges, colorful Old Town and castle that looks like something out of a Disney movie. Even better, it's less than 90 minutes from Basel, a popular starting/ending point for Rhine River itineraries -- making it a fabulous pre- or post-cruise retreat; many offer it as an excursion.

    Photo: gevision/Shuttestock.com

  • 8

    Cochem, Germany

    Germany is home to some of Europe's most storied castles, so it's no surprise one of its towns makes the cut. Cochem, a popular stop on Moselle River itineraries, garners its charm from a romantic castle overlooking the town, half-timbered buildings and surrounding vineyards -- which produce crisp dry Rieslings (be sure to stop by one of Cochem's many wine shops for a taste). For the best view of town and the Moselle Valley, take the Sesselbahn chair lift to Pinnerkreuz Mountain.

    Photo: Sergey Novikov/Shutterstock.com

Find a Cruise

Popular on Cruise Critic

8 Best Luxury Cruise Ships
The moment you step aboard a luxury cruise ship, a hostess is at your arm proffering a glass of bubbly while a capable room steward offers to heft your carry-on as he escorts you to what will be your home-away-from-home for the next few days. You stow your things (likely in a walk-in closet) and then emerge from your suite to get the lay of the ship. As you walk the decks, friendly crew members greet you ... by name. How can that be? You just set foot onboard! First-class, personalized service is just one of the hallmarks of luxury cruise lines. You can also expect exotic itineraries, varying degrees of inclusivity in pricing, fine wines and gourmet cuisine as well as universally high crew-to-passenger ratios. That being the case, you might think any old luxury cruise ship will do, but that's not quite true. Like people, cruise ships have their own unique personalities -- and some will be more suited to your vacation style than others. Lines like SeaDream might not offer the most spacious suites, but their intimate yachts can stealthily visit ports that large ships can't manage. Regent Seven Seas and Oceania Cruises are owned by the same parent company but Regent offers a completely inclusive vacation experience, while Oceania draws travelers with a more independent streak. Take a look at Cruise Critic's list of best luxury cruise lines and ships to see which one resonates with you.
6 Cruise Ship Cabins to Avoid
You might expect loud noises, close quarters and crazy maneuvers in the dance club onboard your cruise ship -- but not in your cabin. Even if you don't plan to spend much time there, it should be a restful and private place so you can maintain that much-needed vacation stamina. To help you do so, we've compiled a list of cabins you'll want to avoid booking if closet-like dimensions or scraping chair sounds overhead aren't appealing to you. Heed our advice, and you might be feeling a bit less claustrophobic and a tad more refreshed come disembarkation.
How To Choose a Cruise Ship Cabin: What You Need to Know
Your room on a cruise ship is called a cabin (or stateroom) and is akin to a hotel room, but typically much smaller. Choosing a cruise ship cabin can be fun and challenging at the same time, and not just a little bit frustrating on occasion. Cabins fall into different types or "categories," and some cruise lines will present as many as 20 or more categories per ship. Before you get overwhelmed, it's helpful to remember that there are essentially only four types of cabins on any cruise vessel: Inside: the smallest-sized room, with no window to the outside Outside: a room with a window or porthole (a round window) with a view to the outside, often similarly sized to an inside cabin or a bit larger; also known as oceanview Balcony: a room featuring a verandah that allows you to step outside without going up to a public deck Suite: a larger cabin, often with separate living and sleeping areas, and a wide variety of extra amenities and perks It's the permutations (size, view, location, amenities and price, for example) of the four basic cabin types that can make choosing difficult. In addition to knowing your cabin options, you need to know yourself: Do you tend to get seasick? Do you prefer to nest peaceably on your balcony rather than hanging with the crowd around the pool area? Conversely, is your idea of a stateroom simply a place to flop into bed at 1 a.m. -- no fancy notions necessary? Are there certain amenities you are willing to splurge on, or can you simply not justify paying for unnecessary perks? The answers will help guide you toward selecting the best stateroom for your money. If you're feeling overwhelmed by choice, we'll help you get started with this guide to choosing the best cruise cabins for you and your travel party.