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American Table and American Feast on Carnival Cruise Line (Plus Menu)

Barbecued St. Louis spare ribs at American Feast on Carnival Pride (Photo: Cruise Critic)
Barbecued St. Louis spare ribs at American Feast on Carnival Pride (Photo: Cruise Critic)

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Rolled out to the Carnival fleet between 2013 and 2019, Carnival's American Table concept is similar to Carnival's previous traditional main restaurant dining, but features a spruced up menu, and casual nights have been marked by a slightly more understated atmosphere (a lack of tablecloths, for example). The menu, which focuses on "modern American cuisine, featuring local and contemporary dishes," is offered in the main dining room on every night (except formal nights) of every sailing on ships that feature it. On formal nights, passengers order from the fancier American Feast menu.

Updated July 6, 2018

Ambiance

The American Table and American Feast dining program define main dining on Carnival ships. On casual evenings, tables are simply laid out with no tablecloths and bread plates that feature iconic U.S. cities; on elegant evenings, American Feast includes white tablecloths and centerpieces, as well as souvenir menus.

American Feast place settings

Meals

American Table

American Table's menu items include shrimp cocktail, veggie spring rolls and marinated chicken tenders as starters; seared tilapia, veal parmesan, baked ziti and a vegetarian dish as entrees; grill items like chicken breast, pork chops and flat iron steak; and sides that feature baked or whipped potatoes, steamed broccoli, and corn and vegetable succotash.

For dessert, diners can choose from chocolate melting cake, passion fruit flan, coconut lime cake, fruit or cheese plates and a selection of ice cream.

American Feast

The menu for American Feast varies slightly by the length of the sailing. Cruises of six nights or more offer broiled Maine lobster tail as an entree option; passengers on voyages of five nights or fewer won't see lobster on their list. Other items on the menu for longer sailings include fried oysters, mushroom cream soup and baby spinach salad as appetizers; spaghetti carbonara, seared striped bass, slow-cooked prime rib and a vegetarian option as mains; and pork, steak, salmon and chicken as grill selections.

On shorter sailings, dishes might be truffled risotto, baked stuffed mushrooms, chilled strawberry bisque and asparagus cream soup for starters; blue crab ravioli, oven-baked Japanese sea bass, grilled jumbo shrimp, barbecued St. Louis spare ribs or zucchini and eggplant parmigiana as mains; and pork, steak, salmon and chicken as grill selections.

Desserts are the same for all sailings, regardless of length. Options include vanilla creme brulee, melted chocolate hazelnut cake, chocolate melting cake, coffee cream cake, fruit and cheese plates, and a selection of ice cream.

American Table and American Feast Menu

Editor's Note: Menus are samples only and are subject to change by ship and itinerary.

Price

American Table and American Feast are included in cruise fares, but for-fee steakhouse items (lamb chops, filet mignon and New York strip loin) carry a $20 surcharge.

Which ships have American Table and American Feast?

American Table and American Feast can be found on all ships in the Carnival Cruise Line fleet.

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