1. Home
  2. Planning
  3. Cruise Policies and Inside Info
  4. Oasis of the Seas vs. Quantum of the Seas: a Cruise Ship Comparison
Quantum of the Seas
Quantum of the Seas

Oasis of the Seas vs. Quantum of the Seas: a Cruise Ship Comparison

Since its debut in 2009, Oasis of the Seas has continued to turn the cruise world upside down. With first-in-cruising innovations like a zip line, a carousel, a levitating bar and real, live trees, it commands respect -- even from those who argue its massive size doesn't appeal. In addition to being the largest ship at sea, it's arguably the most well-known. So where does that leave Royal Caribbean's newest ship, Quantum of the Seas, and how can it possibly step out of the shadow of its behemoth fleetmate?

Updated August 21, 2018

Below we've compiled a list of offerings on both ships to show you exactly what you'll find onboard when you pit Quantum of the Seas versus Oasis of the Seas. Although these two vessels share some of the same venues and amenities, there's a lot that sets them apart, and each provides an experience all its own. Read on to compare Quantum of the Seas and Oasis of the Seas to figure out which of these groundbreaking ships is the right fit for you.

To the right: Quantum of the Seas (top) and Oasis of the Seas. Photo appears courtesy of RCI.

Oasis of the Seas

Quantum of the Seas

Both

Size

Tonnage: 225,282
Passengers: 5,400
Decks: 18
Tonnage: 167,800
Passengers: 4,180
Decks: 16
N/A

Cabins

If you'd rather wake up to trees than ocean views, try a balcony cabin that overlooks Oasis' Central Park or Boardwalk "neighborhood."

When you compare Quantum's cabins, you'll find they are, on average, nine percent larger than those on Oasis. Solo cruisers don't have to worry about dreaded single supplements, either. Twenty-eight studio cabins (12 with balconies) are available for anyone cruising alone. Meanwhile, "virtual balcony" interior cabins offer real-time ocean views via floor-to-ceiling LED screens, and family connected suites combine three cabin types to accommodate larger groups.

Royal Caribbean ships offer several similar stateroom categories across the fleet, but Oasis and Quantum have a couple notable stateroom standouts.

Restaurants

Following its recent dry dock, Oasis received Mexican restaurant Sabor, as well as the Boardwalk Dog House, which originally debuted on sister ship Allure of the Seas. Oasis also offers for-fee options at Giovanni's Table, featuring Italian fare, and upscale 150 Central Park, which boasts a rotating six-course menu.

If you're looking for a quick bite, the Cafe @ Two70 offers gratis picnic-type fare with 270-degree views. Another quick option is the SeaPlex Dog House, the first food truck at sea, featuring free gourmet hotdogs and sausages.

Bars

The Rising Tide Bar, which debuted on Oasis of the Seas, is set on hydraulics and travels between the Royal Promenade and Central Park. In its Bionic Bar, Quantum will feature robotic bartenders. Passengers order drinks via tablets and can then watch as the robots (more like mechanical arms, really) prepare them. Vintages, a swanky wine bar where passengers can try new or favorite beverages, is featured on both ships.

Activities & Entertainment

For breathtaking entertainment that combines aerial and aquatic feats with the ship's wake as the backdrop, you won't want to miss performances at the AquaTheater on the ship's Boardwalk, where you'll also find a carousel. Look up in the sky, and you'll see fellow passengers whizzing by on the sports deck's zipline.

Try any number of at-sea firsts on Quantum, including a visit to North Star. Best for those without a fear of heights, the glass pod, positioned on a mechanical arm, will raise passengers 300 feet above sea level for 360-degree views. Meanwhile, SeaPlex triples as a venue for basketball, roller skating and bumper cars. Adrenaline junkies will appreciate trapeze classes and a RipCord by iFly skydiving simulator.

A handful of RCI ships offer Broadway productions as part of their theater entertainment. Oasis, where cruisers can catch performances of CATS, and Quantum, featuring Mamma Mia!, are no exception. Both ships also feature rock climbing walls and the line's signature FlowRider surf simulators.

Family

Oasis' Adventure Ocean is housed in one giant expanse on the same deck. In addition to exclusive areas separated by age group, there's a science lab, a workshop and even a theater, where participants rehearse before performing for their parents at the end of each sailing.

Quantum's Adventure Ocean spans two decks, and it features a science lab as well as a cool teen space will provide a similar experience to that found on Oasis.

Both ships showcase Royal Caribbean's stellar kids offerings, each boasting extensive Adventure Ocean facilities. The line also has a partnership with DreamWorks, and cruisers can enjoy parades and meet-and-greets that feature Shrek, Fiona and other characters These two vessels also include the H2O Zone, where young cruisers will find splash pools and colorful sculptures that spray water.

Find a Cruise
Email me when prices drop

Popular on Cruise Critic

6 Cruise Ship Cabins to Avoid
You might expect loud noises, close quarters and crazy maneuvers in the dance club onboard your cruise ship -- but not in your cabin. Even if you don't plan to spend much time there, it should be a restful and private place so you can maintain that much-needed vacation stamina. To help you do so, we've compiled a list of cabins you'll want to avoid booking if closet-like dimensions or scraping chair sounds overhead aren't appealing to you. Heed our advice, and you might be feeling a bit less claustrophobic and a tad more refreshed come disembarkation.
8 Best Luxury Cruise Ships
The moment you step aboard a luxury cruise ship, a hostess is at your arm proffering a glass of bubbly while a capable room steward offers to heft your carry-on as he escorts you to what will be your home-away-from-home for the next few days. You stow your things (likely in a walk-in closet) and then emerge from your suite to get the lay of the ship. As you walk the decks, friendly crew members greet you ... by name. How can that be? You just set foot onboard! First-class, personalized service is just one of the hallmarks of luxury cruise lines. You can also expect exotic itineraries, varying degrees of inclusivity in pricing, fine wines and gourmet cuisine as well as universally high crew-to-passenger ratios. That being the case, you might think any old luxury cruise ship will do, but that's not quite true. Like people, cruise ships have their own unique personalities -- and some will be more suited to your vacation style than others. Lines like SeaDream might not offer the most spacious suites, but their intimate yachts can stealthily visit ports that large ships can't manage. Regent Seven Seas and Oceania Cruises are owned by the same parent company but Regent offers a completely inclusive vacation experience, while Oceania draws travelers with a more independent streak. Take a look at Cruise Critic's list of best luxury cruise lines and ships to see which one resonates with you.
How To Choose a Cruise Ship Cabin: What You Need to Know
Your room on a cruise ship is called a cabin (or stateroom) and is akin to a hotel room, but typically much smaller. Choosing a cruise ship cabin can be fun and challenging at the same time, and not just a little bit frustrating on occasion. Cabins fall into different types or "categories," and some cruise lines will present as many as 20 or more categories per ship. Before you get overwhelmed, it's helpful to remember that there are essentially only four types of cabins on any cruise vessel: Inside: the smallest-sized room, with no window to the outside Outside: a room with a window or porthole (a round window) with a view to the outside, often similarly sized to an inside cabin or a bit larger; also known as oceanview Balcony: a room featuring a verandah that allows you to step outside without going up to a public deck Suite: a larger cabin, often with separate living and sleeping areas, and a wide variety of extra amenities and perks It's the permutations (size, view, location, amenities and price, for example) of the four basic cabin types that can make choosing difficult. In addition to knowing your cabin options, you need to know yourself: Do you tend to get seasick? Do you prefer to nest peaceably on your balcony rather than hanging with the crowd around the pool area? Conversely, is your idea of a stateroom simply a place to flop into bed at 1 a.m. -- no fancy notions necessary? Are there certain amenities you are willing to splurge on, or can you simply not justify paying for unnecessary perks? The answers will help guide you toward selecting the best stateroom for your money. If you're feeling overwhelmed by choice, we'll help you get started with this guide to choosing the best cruise cabins for you and your travel party.