Subscribe today
Get Cruise Critic in your inbox

Carnival Freedom Review

Home > Cruise Ship Reviews > Carnival > Carnival Freedom Review
80% of cruisers loved it
  • Roomy cabins, even in the lowest categories
  • "Freedom"-themed decor features Lady Liberty
  • Sails to the Caribbean from Florida

Show the Lowest Price
Departure Month
Please select at least one vendor.
Expedia
Carnival.com
Avoya Travel
Travelocity.com
CheapCruises.com
American Discount Cruises
LuxuryCruiseConnections
CruiseDirector.com
Cruise.com
Priceline.com

Carnival Freedom Overview

(4.0) 4.0 out of 5+ star rating
The 2,974-passenger Carnival Freedom -- the fifth and final incarnation of Carnival Cruise Lines' highly successful Conquest class -- debuted in 2007. Like its Conquest-class sisters, Freedom features a decent ratio of cabins with balconies, a poolside jumbotron, an energetic casino, an ornate three-deck theater, more than a dozen bars and lounges, and a series of shops. The hard-to-please teen set get their own nightclub, too (which is located along the promenade with the rest of the "adult" fare).

Freedom's basic architecture is a conventional sandwich with most public rooms on Decks 3 through 5; most fitness, spa and casual dining on Deck 9 and above; and most passenger cabins in between or below the public room decks. This basic design has been a template for Carnival new-build construction since the introduction of Destiny in 1996. There have been some changes and improvements in attributes and amenities since the class was launched in 2002, most notably the addition of the Seaside Theater, a giant outdoor screen poolside on the Lido Deck (now on almost every Carnival ship), but Freedom suffers from the same passenger-flow bugaboos as do the others in the class. For example, it is impossible to get from the Posh Dining Room at the aft end of the ship to the Victoriana Lounge (main showroom) all the way forward without having to climb or descend one or two decks, and even then one has to pass either through the other dining room or the cigar bar.

But what really sets each Conquest-class ship is the design choices, some of which will invariably have you scratching your head, wondering how they came up with an ambience that was at the same time dark and gaudy. Metallic accents are generally in copper rather then the brighter choice of brass. Lighter colors -- beiges, creams and whites -- appear seldom, and then only as accents. Lighting sconces throughout the Freedom Restaurant, the ship's buffet venue, are fashioned from disembodied heads of the Statue of Liberty casting eerie watery light through their translucent blue fiberglass faces. And all over the ship there are banks of pulsating lights that constantly change color.

Patterns from nature are used as major background elements, but as if seen through a distorting filter. For example, in the Millennium Atrium and throughout the public decks, wood paneling with hyper-emphasized grain patterns in bright orange, black and gray proliferates -- looking like the result of a tiger and a zebra falling into a plywood-manufacturing machine. The ceilings and walls in both main restaurants are done in a black and deep red metallic snakeskin pattern.

Zaniness aside, Freedom ultimately gives you what you'd expect from any of the "Fun Ships" -- gambling, dining, partying, lounging and fun for cruisers of all ages.
Carnival Freedom Fellow Passengers
Expect a casual, largely American group with high energy and a penchant for having fun. Caribbean sailings generally attract the younger end of the scale -- Carnival estimates only 30 percent over 55 -- and feature a healthy blend of Carnival loyalists and first-timers.
Carnival Freedom Dress Code
Casual. Though blue jeans are now off the verboten list, shorts and T-shirts are still unacceptable at dinner -- but that's about it. Even Sun King does not have a dress code beyond the vague "dressy casual." There are two cruise elegant nights, and a decent percentage of passengers go to the formal end of the scale: men in suits or tuxedos, women in cocktail dresses and evening gowns.
Carnival Freedom Gratuity
Carnival recommends $11.50 per person, per day. The guidelines allocate $5.80 to dining room services, $3.70 to cabin services and $2 per day for alternative services, which include kitchen, entertainment, guest services and other hotel staff members. The amount is automatically added to your shipboard account, but can be adjusted in either direction at the guest services desk. A 15 percent gratuity is automatically added to bar bills. Tipping for room service at delivery is expected (and appreciated) by the service staff.
Print the entire ship review


Carnival Freedom Member Reviews 767 Reviews
   A great vacation
March 2014

This was a last minute decission for us to go because i was waiting on passports to get in mail. My husband couldn't go because of work so it was myself, daughter and sister-inlaw. We don't see my sister in law much at all but she so much ...continue


Very easy embarkation other than the longer than expected wait parking our car at the KSA remote lot.

Bus driver made us load and unload our own luggage ... she seemed more interested in making sure that her cigarette didn't burn out ...continue


   Great Cruise On Carnival Freedom!
March 2014

This was mine and my husbands third cruise, this was our second on Carnival. After searching the possible cruises back in January, we found this one to be the best for us. We traveled with our youngest daughter and her 3 1/2 year old daughter. ...continue


1 - 3 of 767 Reviews


Overview   Cabins   Dining   Activities   Family   Itineraries   Deck Plans   More Reviews  
 

Show the Lowest Price
Departure Month
Please select at least one vendor.
Expedia
Carnival.com
Avoya Travel
Travelocity.com
CheapCruises.com
American Discount Cruises
LuxuryCruiseConnections
CruiseDirector.com
Cruise.com
Priceline.com
Sponsored Listings:
About UsAdvertisingEditorial DisclaimerPress
PrivacySite MapStoreSubscribe
X

Thank You For Signing Up!

Please Note: To ensure delivery of your free e-letters, please add news@cruisecritic.com to your address book.

We're committed to protecting your privacy and will not rent or sell your e-mail address. By proceeding, you agree to our Privacy Policy and Terms of Use.